VIDEO Watch Concert with WHS Strings Chorus Soundscape 8th Grade Chorus

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Wilmington High School’s Strings, Chorus and Soundscape Acapella group, along with the 8th grade Chorus, held its Winter Concert on Thursday, December 6, 2018 in the Wilmington High School Auditorium.Wilmington Community Television was on hand to cover the concert. Watch it below:—Video Playerhttps://objects-us-east-1.dream.io/wilmington/f/2/7/9/1/8/f279182a-1fc2-417f-b8b7-ab3752a2a8121544205967.316%2B48988666.360%40castus4-wilmington%2B15442098141544208053979219.vod.720p.8th%20Grade-HS%20Chorus%2C%20Soundscape%2C%20HS%20Strings.mp4Media error: Format(s) not supported or source(s) not foundmejs.download-file: https://objects-us-east-1.dream.io/wilmington/f/2/7/9/1/8/f279182a-1fc2-417f-b8b7-ab3752a2a8121544205967.316%2B48988666.360%40castus4-wilmington%2B15442098141544208053979219.vod.720p.8th%20Grade-HS%20Chorus%2C%20Soundscape%2C%20HS%20Strings.mp4?_=100:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.—Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Thank You To Our Sponsor:Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedVIDEO: Watch 2019 Wilmington Spring Chorus FestivalIn “Videos”VIDEO: Watch Concert with 7th & 8th Grade Strings & Chorus, WHS Chorus & SoundscapeIn “Videos”VIDEO: Watch 2018 Wilmington Spring Choral ConcertIn “Videos”last_img read more

STUDENT SPOTLIGHT Wilmingtons Daniliuk MacDougall Named To Deans List At Emerson College

first_imgBOSTON, MA — The following Wilmington students have been named to Emerson College’s Dean’s List for the Fall 2018 semester:Allison DaniliukSamantha MacDougallThe requirement to make the Dean’s List is a grade point average of 3.7 or higher that semester.About Emerson CollegeLocated in Boston, Massachusetts, opposite the historic Boston Common and in the heart of the city’s Theatre District, Emerson College educates individuals who will solve problems and change the world through engaged leadership in communication and the arts, a mission informed by liberal learning. The College has 3,750 undergraduates and 750 graduate students from across the United States and 50 countries. Supported by state-of-the-art facilities and a renowned faculty, students participate in more than 80 student organizations and performance groups. Emerson is known for its study and internship programs in Los Angeles, Washington, D.C., the Netherlands, London, China, and the Czech Republic. A new, permanent facility on Sunset Boulevard for its L.A.-based program opened in January 2014. The College has an active network of 39,000 alumni who hold leadership positions in communication and the arts. For more information, visit www.emerson.edu.(NOTE: The above announcement is from Emerson College via Merit.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedSTUDENT SPOTLIGHT: Wilmington’s Allison Daniliuk Named To Dean’s List At Emerson CollegeIn “Education”STUDENT SPOTLIGHT: Wilmington’s Allison Daniliuk Named To Dean’s List At Emerson CollegeIn “Education”STUDENT SPOTLIGHT: 3 Wilmington Students Named To Dean’s List At Regis CollegeIn “Education”last_img read more

Mudra Bank Start up India to shore up MSMEs

first_imgWith the opening of the Mudra Bank and Start up India programme, credit for micro, small and medium enterprises (MSMEs) that is a big issue will now change for the better, according to the author of a new report on the subject.Institute of Small Enterprise and Development (ISED) director P.M.Mathew, who has prepared the report that will be launched by Reserve Bank of India (RBI) Deputy Governor S.S. Mundra at Mumbai’s World Trade Centre on Thursday, 26 November, said the new steps by the government in 2015, such as Mudra Bank’s setting up, and Start up India have helped to broad base credit in the Indian economy, especially for MSMEs and other micro-level economic activities.”This, unlike the ‘Loan Melas’ of the 1970s, are likely to make a significant impact on enterprise activities at the ‘bottom of pyramid’,” he said.Mathew said that the international data shows that small business loans on the balance sheets of banks are down about 20% since the 2008 global financial crisis, while loans to larger businesses have risen by about 4% over the same period.SME lending is shrinking with bank loans to SMEs in the US have been falling as a proportion of total loans over the years, he said, adding that this is true of many other European countries as well.”Fortunately, in India, non-profit lenders, crowd funders, and other online lenders are stepping up to fill the gap. These lenders are often leveraging technology to access creditworthiness, underwrite, and service loans while traditional lenders can’t or don’t want to service anymore,” said Mathew.last_img read more

Over 100 die in Malaysian immigration camps in 2 yrs

first_img.More than one hundred foreigners died in the past two years in Malaysia’s immigration detention centers from various diseases and unknown causes, according to documents from the government-funded National Human Rights Commission reviewed by Reuters.The toll, which has not been previously disclosed, is based on Malaysian immigration department data provided to the commission, which is known by its Malay acronym Suhakam. There were 83 deaths in 2015, and at least 35 in 2016 up to 20 December.It is unclear whether the death rate is higher than in neighboring countries. Government officials in Indonesia and Thailand told Reuters they do not disclose such numbers. The rate is higher than in major industrialized nations such as the United States, which in the last financial year recorded 10 deaths in its immigration detention system, which has many more detainees than Malaysia’s.More than half of the 118 dead are from Myanmar, the source for tens of thousands of refugees coming to Malaysia, including Rohingya Muslims escaping persecution by Myanmar’s authorities and its majority Buddhist population. The number of Rohingya fatalities in the camps is unknown.For a graphic on deaths in detention in Malaysia, click hereMalaysian prime minister Najib Razak has been a harsh critic of the Myanmar government and its de-facto leader Aung San Suu Kyi after a crackdown in October by Myanmar’s security forces led many Rohingya to flee across its borders amid multiple allegations of mass killings and gang rapes by troops. He has called for foreign intervention to stop the “genocide” in Myanmar.Najib’s office did not return calls seeking comment.“The numbers are too many and are shocking and it calls for the overhaul of the system,” said Jerald Joseph, one of eight commissioners at Suhakam, which was established by the Malaysian parliament through an act in 1999 and is due to publicly announce the numbers next week in its annual report on human rights issues in Malaysia.He described conditions at the centers, some of which he has visited, as “appalling” and said the deaths should be investigated as a criminal matter.  The illnesses that led to some of the deaths may have been caused or exacerbated by poor sanitation and food, physical abuse and a lack of medical attention, said Joseph, who was speaking on behalf of the commission.BRUTAL CONDITIONSMalaysia’s home ministry, which oversees the immigration department, said it was trying to improve the conditions in the centers but that its budget was constrained.“I agree there is some overcrowding and the conditions are not ideal. We are always trying to improve the procedures, health conditions and management of these sites. The problem is we hit a budget brick wall,” said deputy home minister Nur Jazlan Mohamed in an interview.He said there wasn’t enough funding to upgrade facilities, provide adequate healthcare and hire and train enforcement officers. Jazlan blamed overcrowding on the “never ending flow of people seeking better future in Malaysia.”The living conditions inside the Malaysian camps are grim – overcrowded, unhygienic and brutal – according to interviews with 13 former detainees, and 12 others who have regularly visited the centers, including people from government agencies and rights groups.Those who had been detained say they did not get adequate food, water or healthcare, that many inmates developed skin and lung infections, and the sick are usually not isolated, leading to the spread of contagious diseases.All of the detainees interviewed also allege they were beaten by guards at the camps or witnessed others being beaten. One former Rohingya inmate of the Lenggeng camp in the southwestern state of Negeri Sembilan told Reuters in an interview that he witnessed detainees being beaten and then saw them die when the resulting injuries were not treated. “When we asked for medicines, we were beaten,” he said.Reuters could not independently verify his account or the similar accusations made by other detainees. They all declined to be identified for fear of reprisals.Asked about the claims of beatings, Jazlan said he needs more evidence to establish if it was prevalent.  “I hope critics won’t rely on detainees’ testimony, and come up with proper evidence,” he said.FARED WORSEOf the 118 people recorded as dying in 2015-2016, 63 were from Myanmar, and people from that country have fared worse than those from elsewhere, the documents from Suhakam and data from the Malaysian government’s Enforcement Agency Integrity Commission (EAIC) show.During 2016, for example, there were 14,180 Myanmar nationals detained and at least 14 of them died, while there were only five fatalities among 34,586 Indonesian inmates. The documents and data don’t explain this discrepancy and Reuters was unable to independently confirm the reason for it.People from Myanmar, including Rohingya Muslims, tend to stay in the detention centers longer as they try to persuade the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) to issue them with identification cards that allow them to stay in Malaysia temporarily, rights groups and former detainees said. People from other countries are often undocumented migrant workers who are deported home relatively quickly.Malaysia, which has not signed the UN Refugee Convention, treats refugees as illegal migrants with few rights.Asked about the deaths of Myanmar nationals in Malaysian detention centers, Zaw Htay, who is spokesman for Myamnar’s Suu Kyi, said that “we haven’t heard about these cases.” He also said that “a lot of Bengali people in Malaysia say they come from Myanmar to get UNHCR cards.”“Bengali” is a derogatory term used by many in Myanmar to refer to the Rohingya that suggests they come from Bangladesh, even though many Rohingya have lived in the country for generations.LUNG INFECTIONSThe documents reviewed by Reuters give causes of death for 68 detainees. Pneumonia and lung infections led to 19 deaths, at least 10 were the result of various heart-related conditions, and five died from the bacterial disease leptospirosis, which is often spread through the urine of infected animals, including rodents.Sepsis, or septic shock, a condition usually triggered by other illnesses, claimed 21 victims, including some who were suffering from pneumonia or leptospirosis, various forms of tuberculosis led to three deaths, and one Filipino woman committed suicide.The 13 detention centers in Malaysia held a total 86,795 detainees for various periods during 2016, according to the EAIC.Malaysia isn’t the only country in southeast Asia that has faced criticism for the conditions in its prisons.In its human rights report for 2016, the US State Department said Indonesian and Thai facilities, including those used to detain immigrants, are overcrowded. It said government figures showed that 548 prisoners died “in custody” in Indonesia between January and June of 2016, and 762 died in “official custody” in Thailand in the year to September 2016. However, there was no breakdown between those who died in ordinary jails and those who died in other forms of incarceration, such as immigration detention facilities.No cause was given for 50 deaths in Malaysia. They are classified in the documents as “no report” or “pending autopsy” or “undetermined” or “awaiting report from hospital” or “unascertained.” One center in Kuala Lumpur had 13 deaths in 2016, but no reasons were stated for any of them.When asked about the lack of reasons given for so many deaths, Jazlan said he will look into it.The documents do not specify the reasons for the lower death rate in 2016, though a Reuters analysis of them and related data shows that there was a 27 percent drop in the number of people detained at the end of 2016 from a year earlier.last_img read more

Quaders heart working fine without artificial support

first_imgAwami League general secretary and road transport and bridges minister Obaidul Quader. File PhotoThe Intra-Aortic Balloon Pump (IABP) machine, which was set up in the heart of ailing road transport minister and bridges minister Obaidul Quader, was removed on Thursday morning as his condition is improving gradually, reports news agency UNB.“His heart is working fine without any artificial support,” Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU) director Abu Naser Rizvi, who was accompanying the minister, informed media referring to the statement of cardiologist Philip Koh of Mount Elizabeth Hospital at noon.The kidneys of the minister have been functioning better than before and the quantity of sedative has also been reduced, said Rizvi.”The minister is also responding to doctors’ call,” he added.He further said many of his infections are under control.His wife Isratunnesa Quader and Md Mustafizur Rahman, Bangladesh High Commissioner in Singapore were also present at the briefing.Quader, also general secretary to ruling Bangladesh Awami League (AL), was flown to Singapore on Monday for better treatment as per advice of renowned Indian cardiologist Devi Shetty.The minister was admitted to the BSMMU on Sunday morning following breathing complications. Later, physicians conducted an angiogram and found three blockages in his coronary arteries.last_img read more