The money chase, 2016: U.S. budget out today, be ready with this six-chart primer on science spending

first_img5. Six agencies account for more than 95% of total federal expenditures on basic research, which amounts to about $32 billion this year.Biomedical research rules. The National Institutes of Health is the single most important supporter of basic research, followed by the National Science Foundation, the Department of Energy, and NASA. (These numbers come from the AAAS R&D Budget and Policy Program.) Source: AAAS R&D Budget and Policy Program 3. What really matters is science’s share of discretionary spending: Three cents out of every dollar.That red slice of the pie (upper left) feeds many researchers. Overall, military spending accounts for about one-half of discretionary spending. And although the Pentagon funds some science, most is funded by nondefense agencies. (The military is a major funder of a few fields, including engineering research, computer science, and math.) The annual U.S. federal budget cycle is set to kick off today at 11:30 a.m. in Washington, D.C.,  when the White House releases its spending request to Congress for the 2016 fiscal year that begins in October. Many researchers will be watching closely to see how it treats the agencies that fund their work—and ScienceInsider will be reporting the numbers and providing analysis throughout the day.President Barack Obama has already signaled that he will ask for a 7% increase in discretionary spending (the part of the budget that includes annual research funding). But it’s not yet known how much key science funding agencies will get. Then the Republican-led Congress gets to weigh in, and it’s almost certain to object to things the president wants. Still, the White House request helps set the terms of the annual budget debate, which likely won’t be settled until late this year.Here is some background that will help you put the numbers in context, along with some resources that provide more information.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)1. The big picture: Most federal spending pays for mandatory programs and interest on the debt.All federal spending on research and development (about $140 billion in 2015) fits into the relatively small “discretionary spending” portion of the federal budget. Discretionary spending, which is the only part of the budget that Congress and the White House can control from year to year, accounted for just 29% of the nearly $4 trillion the government will spend this year (the green slice in this pie chart, prepared by the nonprofit National Priorities Project). The rest—71%—goes to so-called mandatory programs, such as the Medicare health program for senior citizens, and interest on the federal debt. This spending is automatic, although Congress can always change the rules that determine how it will be distributed. (The next few charts are based on the White House’s 2015 spending request.) 6. Federal R&D spending has flattened in recent years.A variety of forces, including a laboring economy and efforts to rein in federal spending in the face of looming deficits, have caused some research agency budgets to grow relatively slowly, or in some cases fail to keep pace with inflation. These trends have prompted concern in the research community, which argues they threaten to dampen innovation and long-term economic growth. (In the graph below. “ARRA” refers to the 2009 stimulus spending package.)center_img 4. The majority of funding for basic and applied research comes from nondefense agencies.Many analysts consider spending on basic research to be an especially important barometer of the health of the scientific enterprise. It’s seen as the foundation for innovation, new products, and a higher standard of living. The majority of basic research spending comes from the nondefense discretionary budget. What’s next?Many research groups are hoping that the 2016 budget process ends with appreciable increases in federal spending on research. But a 2011 budget deal between Congress and the White House puts relatively tight limits on how much discretionary spending can grow. With its request for a 7% increase, the White House will argue that it is time to lift those caps. But budget hawks say that the federal deficit, now $460 billion after topping $1 trillion early in the Obama administration, is still too large. Whose side will prevail?If you’d like to learn more about the federal budget process and U.S. science spending, check out these resources:National Priorities Project “Federal Budget 101” primerThe R&D Budget and Policy Program of AAAS (publisher of ScienceInsider)Congressional Research Service report on Federal Research Development Funding: FY2015Come back to ScienceInsider to see our rolling coverage of the budget release.Click here to see all of our Budget 2016 coverage.*Clarification, 1 February, 10:02 p.m.: The text accompanying the third graph has been revised to clarify that it refers to all discretionary spending and that the military is a major funder of some research fields. *Updated, 2 February, 7:45 a.m. 2. Science gets about 1% of total annual federal spending, but that’s not the most important number.Science is that tiny light orange slice at the lower right.last_img read more

Ross Ferrar retires as CEO of Gaming Technologies Association

first_imgAustralia’s Gaming Technologies Association (GTA) has announced the appointment of Chris Muir as CEO following the retirement of its long-serving Chief Executive, Ross Ferrar.Ferrar has led the GTA for 17 years in which time he has developed a strong record of advocating for its members in support of a robust and sound regulatory environment, the GTA said. Load More “I would like to thank Ross for his service to the GTA for the past 17 years,” said GTA Chairman Adrian Halpenny. “He has been a keen and steadfast advocate for the Association and its members and has had a distinguished career in the industry.“The GTA will continue to participate as a voice of reason in the public discourse about poker machines and their role as a legitimate entertainment choice enjoyed by millions of Australians.”Incoming CEO Muir joined the GTA in June after filling senior-level roles in both the NSW and Federal governments, including as a chief of staff to senior ministers and a senior official at AUSTRAC.“I would like to thank Ross for the hard work and guidance he has provided the GTA for almost two decades,” Muir said. “I am excited to continue to work with the GTA members and our industry stakeholders to best represent them on issues pertaining to technical and regulatory matters and advocate strongly for them.” Australasian Gaming Expo sets new attendance record with 9,009 visits in 2019 Success Dragon boss steps down amid business decline RelatedPosts End of an era with Dr Stanley Ho to retire from SJM todaylast_img read more