BIN Urged to be Accountable, Transparent

first_imgThe Deputy Justice Minister for Administration and Public Affairs, Madam Wheatonia Dixon Barnes, last Friday admonished that as Liberia prepares to take over national security from the United Nations Mission in Liberia (UNMIL), security institutions should critically look at accountability and transparency if they are seriously assessing their agenda for the transition. “Self-assessment of every security institution should take into consideration transparency and accountability, promotion of good governance, human rights and respect for rule of law,” Cllr. Barnes declared.Addressing a two-day retreat in Bensonville, organized by the Bureau of Immigration and Naturalization (BIN), Cllr. Barnes advised participants to use the retreat to develop a roadmap to help them address the gaps and challenges in the security sector which will be dealing with the issues of naturalization, immigration and cross border crimes.According to Cllr. Barnes, self assessment is about self-examination and identifying strengths and weaknesses, opportunities and trust of their institution. “You have to use this opportunity to complete a thorough analysis of yourselves and the BIN, particularly in the face of the UNMIL withdrawal and transition,” she said, adding, “Security sector reform is one of the critical areas of peace and nation building, especially in a post-war country like Liberia.”  Earlier, BIN Commission Col. Lemuel E.A. Reeves told his officers that “a few months from now UNMIL will leave our country and security will be in our hands and those of other national security actors. We must be able to take up the mantle to perform as credibly as the Liberian people deserve.”  “We should be looking at integrity, accountability and capacity building during these two days and we need to put aside our differences to make a very great impact for the future of the institution, ourselves and our country,” Col. Reeves said.  For his part, the head of the United Nations Police in Liberia (UNPOL), Gregory J. Hinds, said, “It is time for government to come out with a complete plan and benchmark that will encourage the international community to  fully support our transitional plan,  before  UNMIL’s withdrawal on June 30, 2016.”  “You need to do it, so that you may assume responsibility, development and implementation of your  transitional plan, which should  include BIN and other security agencies that are responsible for border migration management, to make them more effective and efficient to contribute meaningfully to the future of the country,” the UNPOL boss suggested.  Admonishing the participants, Hinds in a very soft tone told the BIN officers, “I urge you to remain an effective, efficient and reliable immigration service. It is your responsibility to discuss honestly your strengths, weaknesses and also think on what steps are needed for the BIN’s sustainability.”Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Boy beheads Pakistani man on video

first_img 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! KILI FAQIRAN, Pakistan — The boy with the knife looks barely 12. In a high-pitched voice, he denounces the bound, blindfolded man before him as an American spy. Then he hacks off the captive’s head to cries of “God is great!” and hoists it in triumph by the hair. A video circulating in Pakistan records the grisly death of Ghulam Nabi, a Pakistani militant accused of betraying a top Taliban official who was killed in a December airstrike in Afghanistan. An Associated Press reporter confirmed Nabi’s identity by visiting his family in Kili Faqiran, their remote village in southwestern Pakistan. The video, which was obtained by AP Television News in the border city of Peshawar on Tuesday, appears authentic and is unprecedented in jihadist propaganda because of the youth of the executioner. Captions mention Mullah Dadullah, the Taliban’s current top commander in southern Afghanistan, although he does not appear in the video. The soundtrack features songs praising Taliban supreme leader Mullah Omar and “Sheikh Osama” — an apparent reference to Osama bin Laden, who is suspected of hiding along the Afghan-Pakistan border. The footage shows Nabi making what is described as a confession, being blindfolded with a checkered scarf. “He is an American spy. Those who do this kind of thing will get this kind of fate,” says his baby-faced executioner, who is not identified. A continuous 2?-minute shot then shows the victim lying on his side on a patch of rubble-strewn ground. A man holds Nabi by his beard while the boy, wearing a camouflage military jacket and oversized white sneakers, cuts into the throat. Other men and boys call out “Allahu akbar!” — “God is great!” — as blood spurts from the wound. The film, overlain with jihadi songs, then shows the boy hacking and slashing at the man’s neck until the head is severed. A Pashto-language voice-over in the video identifies Nabi and his home village of Kili Faqiran in Baluchistan province, which lies about two hours’ drive from the Afghan border. A reporter went to the village, and Nabi’s distraught and angry father, Ghulam Sakhi, confirmed his son’s identity from a still picture that AP made from the footage.last_img read more