Rivers are the world’s heritage. Time to treat them as such (commentary)

first_imgAmazon Dams, Commentary, Dams, Editorials, Environment, Hydroelectric Power, Hydropower, Mekong Dams, Researcher Perspective Series, Rivers, UNESCO World Heritage Site, World Heritage Convention Article published by Mike Gaworecki This July represents a critical opportunity to protect rivers and the World Heritage sites that depend on them. Key government leaders will converge on Baku, Azerbaijan for the 43rd annual meeting of the World Heritage Committee this week.Established under the auspices of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), the Committee is charged with protecting sites around the world deemed of the highest cultural and natural values. But oddly, no river has yet been directly protected by the Committee.Beyond protecting existing sites from harm, the World Heritage Committee needs to broaden its conception of what constitutes a natural site to recognize the intrinsic value of rivers, particularly free-flowing rivers, and the critical role they play in sustaining life.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. This July represents a critical opportunity to protect rivers and the World Heritage sites that depend on them.Key government leaders will converge on Baku, Azerbaijan for the 43rd annual meeting of the World Heritage Committee this week. Established under the auspices of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), the Committee is charged with protecting sites around the world deemed of the highest cultural and natural values. From Machu Picchu to the Great Barrier Reef, these sites represent some of our most precious common treasures. But oddly, no river has yet been directly protected by the Committee.That said, a key underlying theme of the meeting is the growing threat that dams pose to some of the world’s irreplaceable sites. This is the subject of a new report, “Heritage Dammed,” prepared by the Rivers Without Boundaries coalition with contributions from International Rivers (where I work as policy director) and many others. The report finds that over one-quarter of all natural World Heritage sites, including the iconic Lake Baikal in Russia and Serengeti National Park, are being impacted or threatened by water infrastructure such as dams.In recognition of this worsening trend, the World Heritage Committee passed a resolution in 2016 calling for the prohibition on dams within the boundaries of World Heritage sites, as well as for any dams indirectly impacting these sites to be “rigorously assessed.” While a welcome step, this has not prevented key sites from the worst impacts: Last year, Kenya’s Lake Turkana was finally added to the official list of sites in danger only after Ethiopia’s Gibe III Dam cut off flows into the lake, causing lake levels to drop precipitously and leading to extreme food insecurity for the hundreds of thousands of people subsisting off the lake.The sacred waterfalls on the Teles Pires River, Brazil. Photo by Christopher Borges, licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0.Against this backdrop, the issue of dams has come back into focus as a number of critical sites, profiled in the Heritage Dammed report, face renewed threats. These include:• The fate of the Selous Game Reserve in Tanzania — a world class biodiversity hotspot for African wildlife, including endangered species — that is set to be inundated by the planned Rufiji Dam. The plans have provoked an international outcry, prompting one of the world’s largest dam builders, China Three Gorges, to state publicly that it would not pursue the project because it would be located within a World Heritage site.• The future of the Mesopotamian Marshes in Iraq, which sustain important freshwater fisheries and a vibrant local culture, after the government of Turkey announced the completion of the Ilisu Dam near the headwaters of the Tigris River. Opponents around the world have rallied to contest plans to begin filling the reservoir, which would submerge the town of Hasankeyf — renowned for being continuously inhabited for the past 12,000 years — in the process. Filling of the reservoir has been postponed as a result, but the threat remains.• The Sumatran Rainforest site in Indonesia, officially listed as “In Danger” since 2011 over the construction of dams and other developments. The site has again emerged as a flashpoint in light of the discovery of the newly identified species, the Tapanuli orangutan, with only 800 remaining and at risk of extinction with a dam proposed in the middle of its only habitat. Plans to build the 510-megawatt Batang Toru Dam have been cast into doubt, however, as the Bank of China announced it would reevaluate its plans to finance the dam in light of sustained protest.Selous Game Reserve World Heritage Site, Tanzania. Photo by Greg Armfield.To proactively address the growing threat of dams, the report makes specific recommendations for how the Committee can improve the protection of rivers, including the use of preemptive strategic environmental assessments, among other precautionary measures.But beyond protecting existing sites from harm, the World Heritage Committee needs to broaden its conception of what constitutes a natural site to recognize the intrinsic value of rivers, particularly free-flowing rivers, and the critical role they play in sustaining life. Free-flowing rivers form the bedrock for local cultures and communities and have huge ecological significance, serving as the world’s last bastion of dwindling freshwater biodiversity. Indeed, a recent study by WWF found that dams are the biggest culprit in the 83 percent decline in freshwater biodiversity experienced globally between 1970 and 2014. Yet of the world’s 177 largest rivers, only one-third are free flowing, and just 21 rivers longer than 1000 kilometers retain an unobstructed connection to the sea.Many free-flowing rivers sit adjacent to existing World Heritage sites, but their values are not recognized or protected. For example, the actual river ecosystems of the Three Parallel Rivers of Yunnan heritage site in China are deliberately excluded from the protected area. They are now threatened again by the construction of mega-dams on all three rivers, including one of Asia’s last free-flowing rivers, the Nu-Salween, which originates in the Tibetan Plateau and flows through China and Myanmar. Still more of the world’s threatened rivers have no world heritage designation, from the mighty Congo River in Central Africa to the Karnali River, Nepal’s last, most pristine free-flowing river.While the world’s last free-flowing rivers are often subjected to reckless plans to harness them for their hydropower potential, the Baku meeting is also coming at a time of positive momentum as countries have begun to recognize the rights of rivers and river advocates lead campaigns to secure permanent legal protections for rivers. The World Heritage Committee should join this growing movement and take the lead in calling for free-flowing rivers to be protected and the nomination of iconic rivers as World Heritage sites.The Glen Canyon Dam on the Colorado River in the United States. Photo by Christian Mehlführer, licensed under CC BY 2.5.Josh Klemm is Policy Director for International Rivers.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Critiques of carbon credits aren’t asking the right question (commentary)

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Carbon Credits, Carbon Emissions, Climate Change, Climate Change And Forests, Commentary, Editorials, Environment, Forest Carbon, Forests, Global Warming, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Researcher Perspective Series Rather than dwelling too much on the conclusions that critiques of carbon credit schemes seem to put forward with such conviction, we should step back and consider, “Are they asking the right question to begin with?”Ultimately, these critiques are premised on the question of whether carbon credits have, to date, delivered all the benefits they’ve promised. Their answer: A decisive “no.” The problem is that such a question, and the response, will leave many readers with the impression that carbon credits are simply a bad option, and we’ll have to look elsewhere for solutions to climate change. Unfortunately, we no longer have such a luxury.So, instead, let’s ask this: “Is there any way to achieve the goals of the Paris Agreement without protecting the world’s forests?” The answer here is another resounding “no,” but this one with much more serious implications.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. fFor those of us who have worked in the world of carbon credits for many years, the criticisms raised in articles like “An (Even More) Inconvenient Truth,” published by ProPublica last month, are nothing new. The idea of allowing polluters to offset their emissions, including by paying to protect or restore forests, has been around for decades, and we’ve heard it all before.Rather than dwelling too much on the conclusions these critiques seem to put forward with such conviction, we should step back and consider, “Are they asking the right question to begin with?”Ultimately, these critiques are premised on the question of whether carbon credits have, to date, delivered all the benefits they’ve promised. Their answer: A decisive “no.” While the recent ProPublica article is not without fault, there is no doubt that many carbon offset programs have failed to live up to expectations over the years, including some profiled in that story.The problem is that such a question, and the response, will leave many readers with the impression that carbon credits are simply a bad option, and we’ll have to look elsewhere for solutions to climate change. Unfortunately, we no longer have such a luxury. We are not in a position to pick and choose our responses to the climate emergency as we would items on a menu. The fact is, we need every solution on the table.So, instead, let’s ask this: “Is there any way to achieve the goals of the Paris Agreement without protecting the world’s forests?” The answer here is another resounding “no,” but this one with much more serious implications. The fact is emission reductions alone — however significant — will not be able to limit global warming to 1.5 or even 2 degrees above that of the pre-industrial age. We must also invest in nature. And to do that, carbon credits have a central role to play.By framing the discussion this way, rather than bemoaning past failures, we quickly come to understand just how important it is to learn from these missteps and move forward.The good news is this is already happening, and the diagnosis on carbon credits is not nearly as dire as the ProPublica article suggests. When designed and implemented well, they are an extremely effective response to climate change.The main problem is that ProPublica’s reporter, and many others, still look at the UN’s program for reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation, known as REDD+, solely as a project-level effort. It’s certainly true that the first generation of initiatives to prevent deforestation were implemented on a project-by-project basis. And, as you would expect, the quality and impact of isolated projects has varied greatly, many succumbing to the failings elaborated in the article. Unfortunately, this legacy of isolated projects has stuck with REDD+ and is perpetuated through articles like ProPublica’s.In reality, though, we’ve come a long way in our understanding since then. In fact, over seven years of negotiations, the United Nations developed a framework to incentivize and implement activities to reduce deforestation. By 2015, it was already clear that the project-level response was not sufficient, and, to be effective, efforts needed to be led at the sub-national or national level. Indeed, this is how REDD+ was written into the Paris Agreement.To give just one example: the Bujang Raba Community PES Project, coordinated by KKI Warsi in Jambi, Indonesia. Facilitated by the Indonesian REDD+ Management Agency, the project conserves 5,339 hectares (about 13,193 acres) of endangered primary rainforest in Sumatera’s Bukit Barisan forest. It involves five indigenous communities. The site is managed by the communities under a “hutan desa” (village forest) program that recognizes and secures land tenure and allows community members to sustainably manage the forest. By engaging local communities, the project reduces forest fires, illegal poaching, and unsustainable harvesting of forest products.According to Planvivo, which established the carbon standard used by the project, the project produces a 40,000-tons-of-CO2-per-year carbon benefit, and conserves the home of threatened species such as the Malayan Tapir (Tapirus indicus), Sun Bear (Helarctos malayanus), and the critically-endangered Sumatran Tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae). It also diversifies income for participating communities by introducing high-value crops such as cardamom, cocoa, and other non-timber products. Bamboo and rattan processing facilities will also open other income streams for the communities. And this is just one example.In short, it’s far too early to call time of death on carbon credits. It’s encouraging to see momentum growing among countries, sub-national actors, and the private sector to ratchet up efforts to the scale needed. But there’s a lot of work still to be done. At the country level, more can be done to include natural climate solutions in national climate targets, which would help drive demand for finance. And, similarly, at the international level, more can be done to use the flexibility allowed by the Paris Agreement for countries to develop natural climate solutions partnerships to increase emission reductions. The upcoming Climate Summit hosted by the UN Secretary-General this September offers a wonderful opportunity to make progress on these fronts.No one says this is going to be easy, but let’s start by asking the right questions. And then let’s work together to move forward.A juvenile sun bear at the Bornean Sun Bear Conservation Centre, Malaysia. The Bujang Raba Community PES Project in Jambi, Indonesia conserves crucial habitat for the bears. Photo Credit: Siew Te Wong, Thye Lim Tee, and Lin May Chiew, BSBCC.Agus Sari is CEO of Landscape Indonesia. He was Deputy Minister / Deputy Chair of the Indonesian REDD+ Management Agency. He was Co-Chair of the Working Group and Negotiating Contact Group on REDD+ Financing leading up to and at the 2013 UNFCCC COP19.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Article published by Mike Gaworeckilast_img read more

Newly described Chinese giant salamander may be world’s largest amphibian

first_imgThe critically endangered Chinese giant salamander is not just one, but three distinct species, researchers have now confirmed in a new study.One of the newly recognized species, the South China giant salamander (Andrias sligoi), could be largest amphibian on the planet, the researchers say.The researchers say they hope the recognition of the Chinese giant salamanders as three species will help the amphibians’ conservation by triggering separate management plans for the species. The Chinese giant salamander, which reaches lengths of more than 5 feet (1.6 meters), enjoys the title of being the world’s largest living species of amphibian. However, the critically endangered salamander is not just one, but three distinct species, researchers have now confirmed in a new study.One of the newly recognized species, the South China giant salamander (Andrias sligoi), could be largest amphibian on the planet, the researchers say.“These findings come at a time where urgent interventions are required to save Chinese giant salamanders in the wild,” Melissa Marr, a doctoral researcher at the Natural History Museum, London, and co-author of the study, said in a statement. “Our results indicate that tailored conservation measures should be put in place that preserve the genetic integrity of each distinct species.”A. sligoi painting. Image courtesy of ZSL.The Chinese giant salamander was once widespread across central, eastern and southern China. But habitat loss, poaching, and illegal collection for farming as luxury food items wiped out most animals, making them incredibly rare in the wild today. Millions of these salamanders live on farms, though.In a study published last year, Samuel Turvey, a conservation scientist at the Zoological Society of London, and colleagues who spent four years surveying the salamander’s preferred river habitats across 97 counties in China reported finding only 24 wild individuals at four sites. But even those were likely farmed animals, the researchers said, ones that had either escaped or had been released as part of government-sponsored conservation initiatives.For a long time, all Chinese giant salamanders were considered to be a single species, Andrias davidianus. Some researchers did suspect that the salamander likely comprised more than just the one species, and another study by Turvey and team published last year found just that: analysis of tissue samples from 70 wild-caught and 1,034 farm-bred salamanders showed that the Chinese giant salamander once included least five genetically distinct lineages. Today’s salamanders, however, show extensive hybridization as a consequence of mixing of the species through farming, the researchers said.These genetic studies, however, relied on samples collected in recent decades, when the salamanders had already been moved extensively for farming, making conclusions about distinct species difficult. In the latest study, Turvey and his colleagues analyzed samples from a series of historical museum specimens of the salamanders to see what the wild local populations of the Chinese giant salamander may have been like before the onset of widespread farming and movement of the animals by humans.In the end, the team identified three distinct genetic lineages, sufficiently different enough to represent separate species, each associated with a different river drainage system. These include A. davidianus, A. sligoi, and a third, yet-to-be-named species. The different species of Chinese giant salamanders began to diverge 3.1 million years ago, Turvey said, corresponding to a period of mountain formation in China, as the Tibetan Plateau rose rapidly.Of the three recognized species, the South China giant salamander (A. sligoi) is most likely the largest, reaching 2 meters (6 feet) in length, the researchers say. The third species, which is known only from tissue samples and not any complete specimen, hasn’t yet been formally described.The researchers say they hope that the recognition of the Chinese giant salamanders as three species will help the amphibians’ conservation by triggering separate management plans for the species. The team also urges that efforts be made to identify and protect sites where wild populations of the three different Chinese giant salamander species may still occur.“Salamanders are currently moved widely around China, for conservation translocation and to stock farms that cater for China’s luxury food market,” Turvey said. “Conservation plans must now be updated to recognise the existence of multiple giant salamander species, and movement of these animals should be prohibited to reduce the risk of disease transfer, competition, and genetic hybridisation.”A wild Chinese giant salamander. Image by Ben Tapley.Citation:Turvey, S. T., Marr, M. M., Barnes, I., Brace, S., Tapley, B., Murphy, R. W., … & Cunningham, A. A. (2019). Historical museum collections clarify the evolutionary history of cryptic species radiation in the world’s largest amphibians. Ecology and Evolution. doi:10.1002/ece3.5257 Amphibians, Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Endangered Species, Environment, Green, New Species, Research, Salamanders, Species Discovery, Wildlife Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Shreya Dasguptalast_img read more

In other news: Environmental stories from around the web, Jan. 10, 2020

first_imgConservation, Environment, Weekly environmental news update Article published by John Cannon There are many important conservation and environmental stories Mongabay isn’t able to cover.Here’s a digest of some of the significant developments from the week.If you think we’ve missed something, feel free to add it in the comments.Mongabay does not vet the news sources below, nor does the inclusion of a story on this list imply an endorsement of its content. Tropical forestsForest countries and food companies must build “trust,” one commentator says (Ethical Corporation).Chocolate producers see regulations as a possible solution to a long struggle with child labor in the industry (The Morning Call).New research ties deforestation to Ebola outbreaks (CIFOR Forests News).Indigenous groups in India cry foul about a rule requiring reforestation for any forest loss (Undark).Lemurs in Madagascar need a more organized reforestation effort to save them, a scientist says (The Washington Post) …… While a new paper has found that Madagascar could lose all of its forest by 2070 (UPI).Communities in the Solomon Islands are working to stave off illegal logging (National Geographic).Police investigate whether illegal logging played a role in floods in Indonesia (The Jakarta Post).Other newsAlmonds depend on pollination by bees, and it turns out it’s a deadly task (The Guardian).A gray whale joined surfers for a session in San Diego (Men’s Journal).Here are some ways to help out Australia as the country has lost more than a billion animals to wildfires (CNET) …… While its leader has drawn criticism for his handling of the crisis and his pro-fossil fuels stance (The Washington Post).The fires aside, Australia sits on the front line of climate change (The Atlantic).Global temperatures during 2019 were the second-highest on record, just behind 2016 (The New York Times).A second coyote attack on humans has occurred in Chicago (The New York Times).The great auk went from thriving to extinct in less than four centuries (Hakai Magazine).Climate change is threatening new targets: the marine labs poised at the sea’s edge (The New York Times).More acidic marine environments could hamper the U.S. economy (Scientific American).The 2004 tsunami relief efforts brought in aid to help fishing communities rebound, but now there’s evidence that the surge may be leading to damaged ecosystems (Devex).How much does that carbon offset fee on your airline ticket help? (YES Magazine).Traditions may help protect hunted birds in Lebanon (The New York Times).Banner image of a female crowned lemur (Eulemur coronatus) by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Xavante tribe digs in as Brazil reneges on vow not to build a road in their reserve

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored For more than 50 years, the Xavante indigenous group has been fighting to regain sovereignty of the Marãiwatsédé Indigenous Reserve in Mato Grosso state. The most recent obstacle is the federal government’s plan to pave BR-158, the interstate highway that cuts through the middle of the reserve.Marãiwatsédé is the most heavily deforested indigenous reserve in the Legal Amazon: around 75% of its native vegetation has already been cut down. The Xavante suspect that paving the dirt track is part of the federal government’s plan to authorize leasing part of the reserve to ranchers in the region.In 2009, the Xavante began a lengthy negotiation process with government agencies to define alternatives to the original roadway. It was decided that BR-158 would circumvent the reserve, running to the east of its borders. But the government of President Jair Bolsonaro does not support the change, resulting in a stalemate that has escalated tensions in the region. The grief that plagues the Xavante people of northeastern Mato Grosso state in Brazil seems far from over. For more than 50 years now, the indigenous group has been fighting to regain sovereignty of the Marãiwatsédé Indigenous Reserve, which covers 1,650 square kilometers (640 square miles) in the valley where the Araguaia and Xingu river basins meet. Their biggest obstacle today is an unfinished interstate highway, the BR-158, that cuts through their land. The tension in the reserve has been growing, and the federal government has failed to find a solution for the impasse. On the contrary, the ministry of infrastructure insists on keeping the current roadway, which has already given way to a series of threats to the indigenous people.On Nov. 19 last year, the government included the 121 km (75 mi) of dirt road of BR-158 carved into the Marãiwatsédé Indigenous Reserve on its list of priorities for future concessions.“How [can the government] make a decision over the interstate without talking with us?” Damião Paridzané, the cacique, or historic leader, of the Xavante, said in a statement to Mongabay. “You can’t cut down a tree here without asking us. It seems as if they want to do everything without consulting with the Indians.”Interstate BR-158 has been associated with such problems as criminal invasions and illegal fires in the dwindling native forest that remains in Marãiwatsédé. It is now the most heavily deforested indigenous reserve in the Legal Amazon, with an accumulated loss of 75.7% of vegetation, according to Brazil’s Monitoring Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon by Satellite Project (known as PRODES). What remains now are “islands” with vestiges of unique vegetation, characteristic of the transition between the biomes of the Amazon rainforest and the Cerrado savanna.Cacique Damião’s passions flare when the subject turns to the government’s plan to pave the original trajectory of Interstate BR-158, which it had previously been agreed would be diverted to circumvent the reserve rather than cut through it: “When are they going to keep the promise they made, to move the interstate far from here?”In 2009, the Xavante began a long negotiation with the National Department of Transportation Infrastructure (DNIT), the National Indian Foundation (FUNAI), the Brazilian Institute of the Environment and Renewable Resources (IBAMA) and the Federal Public Ministry in order to define alternatives to the road’s original course. It was decided at that time that Interstate BR-158 could be diverted to the east of the reserve.Though progress since then was slow, the project advanced with environmental authorizations for the construction of the new trajectory. But the Ministry of Infrastructure under the new president, Jair Bolsonaro, does not support the alternative.The ministry confirmed to Mongabay that the plan is indeed to pave the 121 km that cut through the reserve. On the other hand, the ministry guaranteed that it would follow “all the legal formalities, including the participation of the indigenous communities.”Others involved in the matter declined to comment, including the secretary of infrastructure for Mato Grosso state, and the offices of the mayors of Alto Boa Vista, Bom Jesus do Araguaia and São Félix do Araguaia, the municipalities that comprise the indigenous lands.Image of the Xavante people at the time of their forced removal by the military in the 1960s. Image courtesy of FUNAI.Broken agreements and a promise of warThe Xavante’s fight for their lands is intimately connected to BR-158. The interstate symbolizes a trauma inflicted during a time of dictatorship: in 1966, around 400 members of the ethnic group were herded onto military planes and expelled from their territory. The area was evacuated explicitly to enable the clearing of forest for BR-158.“The highway is part of the history of the Xavante and the fight to reclaim their territory,” says public prosecutor Wilson Rocha Assis. He was part of the Federal Public Ministry in Barra do Garças, Mato Grosso, where he worked for reparations for violations against the ethnic group.He also participated in the development of the alternative trajectory for the highway, and called the new administration’s insistence on sticking with the original course a “mistake.” “Veering east would be a win for everyone, because it would diminish the threats to the Marãiwatsédé while integrating municipalities that are left out, like Serra Nova Dourada, Mato Grosso, strengthening the local economy,” says Assis, who now works in Goiás state.The minister of infrastructure, Tarcísio Gomes, disagrees. According to him, the decision to maintain the course of the interstate running through the indigenous land is, first and foremost, an economic issue.In June 2019, he discussed the impasse with the director general of the National Department of Transportation Infrastructure, Antônio Leite dos Santos Filho, and politicians from Mato Grosso allied with agribusiness — including Governor Mauro Mendes and federal representatives Neri Gueller and Carlos Fávaro of the ruralist caucus.On that occasion, Gomes said the plan was to substitute the wooden bridges inside the reserve with concrete structures, as well as to finish paving the stretch of road through Marãiwatsédé. “We are going to deal with whatever we have to, but BR-158 will have the same original course, which makes more sense economically … This is why we’re going to fight. Leave the confrontation to us,” the minister said.The coming fight could very well be literal. The Xavante have made clear they are ready to face the ultimate consequences if the interstate is not redirected: “Let it be clear that our decision is for the destruction of the bridges cutting through our territory. We know that this action will cause conflicts, but it is the only alternative we have left,” they wrote in a letter to the National Department of Transportation Infrastructure in 2018.One of Damião’s sons, Cosmo, also criticized the interstate’s legacy in the reserve. “I say, as an indigenous man, who lives with my community on a daily basis, that our situation is precarious. This road is being utilized without a landowner … They are only attending to people who have economic interests,” he said at a public hearing in Congress. At the time, lawmakers insisted on the controversial pavement plan.Last July, the Federal Public Ministry in Mato Grosso spoke up, demanding greater flexibility from the federal government in resolving the stalemate. It filed a lawsuit to force the government to shut down the stretch inside Marãiwatsédé. According to the Federal Public Ministry, paving the road would facilitate new invasions and other threats, further suggesting that the Xavante demands do not move the federal government to action.“Paving the road will have an irreparable impact on the landholding order in the region and make it impossible for the authorities to make good on their obligations to the Xavante,” federal prosecutor Everton Pereira Aguiar Araújo said in the lawsuit.He also said ”there is an evident correlation between the existence of the roadway [BR-158] and the incidence of damages to the indigenous land,” and criticized the government’s priorities, saying its “greatest concern is to maintain Interstate BR-158 and that all other issues are accidental.” The lawsuit is now circulating in the federal courts in Mato Grosso, with no decision announced yet.Traditional Xavante log race. Image by Fora do Eixo (CC BY-NC-SA).A history of invasions, resistance and violenceBR-158 was also the stage for a conflict that deeply scarred the Xavante people. In 1992, the largest invasion of the reserve took place right at the intersection with another highway, BR-242, where a village called Posto da Mata was founded.After a 20-year saga in the court system, the Supreme Court of Brazil (STF) ruled that the invaders be expelled. Between 2012 and 2014, the indigenous people retook the area with the support of law enforcement agencies and the Federal Public Ministry. But around 2,000 people resisted, leading to a dangerous escalation in tensions.“[The invaders] broke into FUNAI headquarters in Marãiwatsédé and set fire to everything — destroying documents, equipment and whatever else was there,” says prosecutor Wilson Assis, who worked on the case.At the time, public figures like Damião Paridzané and the bishop emeritus of São Félix do Araguaia, Dom Pedro Casaldáliga, as well as FUNAI employees, faced death threats — no trivial matter in an area known to have assassins for hire and gunmen since the 1960s.The Federal Public Ministry accused 13 people of being part of a criminal organization that had coordinated the invasions. In its complaint, it alleged that this group manipulated public opinion in the municipalities neighboring the reserve, like Alto Boa Vista and São Félix do Araguaia, with the objective of favoring large-scale farmers and local politicians.The criminal scheme even spilled over into Congress. The investigation revealed ties between the overseers of the invasions and representatives in Brasília. The Supreme Court went so far as to open an investigation into the case. In 2016, the inquiry was shelved at the request of the court’s president, Dias Toffoli, on grounds of judicial confidentiality.The contentious expulsion of the invaders turned into a political powder keg in the region. Tensions got to a point that the Federal Public Ministry was forced to make a statement about the impasse in early 2019, promising “an energetic and effective response” in the event of any attack or reoccupation of the old Posto da Mata.For Damião, the current climate of tension serves only to weaken the indigenous people’s sovereignty over their lands.In particular, the Xavante believe that the federal government wants to authorize the leasing of part of the reserve to ranchers in Araguaia-Xingu. President Bolsonaro has never made any attempt to hide his support for the idea of leasing out indigenous lands.“Do they think we’re fools?” Damião said. “If you lease to one, then another one will pop up, then a bunch more. What we want is support, real help from FUNAI to take care of our land.”This story was first reported by Mongabay’s Brazil team and published here on our Brazil site on Jan. 23, 2019. Article published by Xavier Bartaburucenter_img Amazon, Amazon Biodiversity, Amazon Destruction, Biodiversity, Indigenous Communities, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Reserves, Indigenous Rights, Infrastructure, Mrn-amazon Infrastructure, Rainforest Deforestation, Roads last_img read more

Morocco, Senegal secure perfect start at AFCON 2019

first_imgMorocco are on the hunt for their second AFCON title. (PHOTOS/Agencies)AFCON 2019Sunday, 23-06-2019-Morocco 1-0 Namibia-Senegal 2-0 TanzaniaThe 2019 Africa Cup of Nations continued on Sunday with action from both Group C and D.In the opening fixture of the day, Morocco required a late own-goal to take care of Namibia.Striker Litamunua Keimuine was the unfortunate player, putting through his own net with only a minute to play, handing the Atlas Lions a narrow victory.Keimuine misjudged Ajax winger Hakim Ziyech’s free-kick in the 89th minutes, wrong-footing his goal keeper Lloyd Kazapua.It was a game which was dominated by the North African side who are eager to impress and may be, secure a first AFCON title since their only, 43 years ago.Despite having more possession and boosting a squad which featured one of the brightest prospect in world football, in Hakim Ziyech, Morocco struggled to break down Namibia and were consistently limited to speculative efforts.Nabil Dirar forced Namibia goalkeeper Loydt Kazapua to tip a looping long-range shot over in an uneventful first half, while Nordin Amrabat went down under a challenge by Danzil Haoseb but saw his appeals for a penalty dismissed.Two-time winning coach Herve Renard’s side were limited to largely long-range attempts against a Namibia side making their first appearance since 2008.With his side struggling to create chances, Herve Renard introduced Spanish based forward Sofiane Boufal and as soon as the former Southampton man stepped onto the pitch, Morocco breathed a new lease of life.Boufal forced Kazapua into an immediate low-save but much like the players who started the game, he did not have any better luck.For Ziyech, he looked lively throughout the afternoon but Namibia had an answer to the questions he asked until the free-kick off which Keimuine put the deciding head.Namibia who came into the match as over whelming under-dogs will go back to their hotel rooms with their heads held high.The points see Morocco temporarily go top of Group D with Ivory Coast and South Africa squaring off on Monday afternoon.Next, Morocco face Renard’s former side Ivory Coast on Friday, while Namibia come up against South Africa later on the same day.In the Group C game played in the evening, Senegal powered past Tanzania 2-0 to also temporarily move top of their group.After a dominant start to the game, the 2004 finalist took the lead through forwars Balde Keita’s low finish at the near post.Senegal dominated the game from start to finish.Four minutes past the hour mark, Krepin Diatta blasted in a second from the edge of the box to hand the Lions of Teranga an advantage that they would hold on until the end.Even with out the suspended Sadio Mane, Senegal created a handful of chances and their coach-Aliou Cisse will be disappointed they only put two away in the end.Tanzania, making a first appearance since 1980, had goalkeeper Aishi Manula to thank early on as the 23-year-old twice denied M’Baye Niang in the opening six minutes.Two minutes after slotting in to the bottom corner, Balde should have added the 2017 quarter-finalists’ second but blazed over from Ismaila Sarr’s cut-back.Sarr, who consistently troubled Tanzania down the right, had a goal disallowed midway through the first half as Crystal Palace’s Cheikhou Kouyate was penalised for handball in the build-up.Manula again came to the rescue for Tanzania after the interval, stretching to guide a Diatta header to safety and smothering an effort from Sarr.But Senegal were untroubled at the back and Club Brugge midfielder Diatta made the points safe for Cisse’s side with an excellent first-time strike from out side the area.The other group C game between Algeria and Kenya will be played later on Sunday at 11 pm.Monday’s fixtures – Ivory Coast vs South Africa @5:30pm-Tunisia vs Angola @8pm-Mali vs Mauritania @11pmComments Tags: AFCON 2019Aliou CisseHerve RenardMoroccoNamibiaSenegalTanzaniatoplast_img read more

Mack’s Stubbs hits bank shot with five seconds left to give Panthers 76-75 OT win over Piner in first round of AIBT

first_imgArcata >> A.J. Stubbs may not hit a bigger shot in his life.The McKinleyville Panthers forward took a pass from teammate Leo Ashford and hit a short bank shot with just five seconds left to give Mack a 76-75 overtime victory over the Piner Prospectors in a first-round game at the 49th Annual Jerry Paul Arcata Invitational Basketball Tournament on Thursday evening at Arcata High School.“I just felt like it was right for me to take it,” said Stubbs, who finished with six points in the game. “It …last_img read more

South African canoeing shines in Germany

first_img4 August 2015South African canoeist and four-time K1 and K2 Dusi marathon winner Andy Birkett won a silver medal at the season-opening ICF Marathon World Cup at the Brandenburg an den Havel regatta in Germany on 2 August.Following a three-boat battle for first place between Birkett, Hungarian Adam Petro and Belgian Dries Corrijn, an unexpected wake from an official’s boat helped Petro gain the upper hand by a boat length over Birkett at the finish line. But the South African was unperturbed, saying after the race: “I am chuffed with the medal.”He added: “The pace was fast for the first hour-and-a-bit until we whittled it down to four paddlers. Soon it came down to the Hungarian, the Belgian and myself as we came into the last portage.“I had a good last portage, and I pulled the last small lap into the finish line with the Hungarian on my side wave, and got caught out in the end sprint by the Hungarian.“It was great racing, but more importantly it was awesome practice before the Worlds,” he added.His silver ends a good weekend in Germany for the South African team. Birkett also won the new short marathon sprint event on Saturday, while teammates Greg Louw finished fourth in the same race, and Olympic sprint medallist Bridgitte Hartley won the women’s race.Birkett won the national senior K1 marathon title in June and is a former under- 23 marathon world champion. He was happy with his time and placing in preparation for the Marathon World Champs in Gyor, Hungary in September, which will include several other major races in Europe.The reigning world champion is fellow South African Hank McGregor.This year is Birkett’s first participation in international competition and this first podium finish has been an inspiring start for the canoeist. However, he admitted to a bit of frustration during this first race, which he called “all a learning curve”.His next race is the Sella Descent in Spain next week.Source: News24Wirelast_img read more

5 DIY Filmmaking Gear Tutorials

first_imgHave a project you need to get in the can? Running low on cash? Check out these DIY filmmaking gear tutorials to help you get on your way.Filmmaker and videography gear can bust your budget before you even start shooting. There’s no reason to go broke — affordable gear solutions are easy to find, especially if you’re willing to take a DIY approach. We’ve rounded up a small list of tutorials that show how easy it is to craft your own DIY filmmaking gear. With a few tools and a little patience, you’ll be on your way in no time.1. DIY Light StandIn our first video tutorial, Ryan Connolly and the Film Riot crew demonstrate how to make a DIY light stand for around $10. This easy-to-build stand uses no glue, which means you can easily collapse it and take it wherever you want. If you need something a little more heavy duty, you can essentially take this concept and upgrade the materials.2. DIY Shoulder RigShoulder rigs can get expensive — if you don’t have the cash for a pro rig, then this clip from The Slanted Lens offers a pretty solid solution. Follow along as cinematographer Lars Lindstrom demonstrates how to create a DIY shoulder rig on the cheap. Just remember that this particular DIY shoulder rig works best with DSLR cameras.3. DIY Bank LightingThis episode of Basic Filmmaker covers the process of putting together a set of DIY bank lights. Here’s what you’ll need: a shop light, bulbs, and a mounting bracket. Grabbing a C-stand from Amazon will give you a place to mount your finished product.4. DIY Timelapse SliderThis video from RCexperimental demonstrates how to build a DIY timelapse slider with motor. This one is a little more advanced. For instance, you’ll need to do some soldering. Plus, you’ll need a motor (which can be found at Solar Botics). All in all, you should be able to build this slider for around $20.5. DIY 3-Axis GimbalHere’s what you’ll need to build a DIY 3-axis gimbal, as demonstrated in the video below from Tom Antos. First, you’ll need a Foxtech Falcon Camera Gimbal and a shoulder rig. Since you’ll be using a DSLR, you can purchase a cheap shoulder rig, or, you know, build the one we featured up top. This is the most expensive project on this list; it will set you back about $300. Still, that price is a lot less than what you’d pay for a professional 3-axis gimbal. Plus, you’ll have the satisfaction of having built it yourself!Got any fun DIY filmmaking gear projects you can share with the community? Let us know in the comments below.last_img read more

Arunachal govt. erects statue to honour Bhupen Hazarika

first_imgThe Arunachal Pradesh government has erected a statue of legendary music composer and singer Bhupen Hazarika at Bolung village in Dibang Valley district of the State.The ten-foot bronze statue, sculpted by Biren Singh of Guwahati, was erected in the village this year. It would be formally unveiled in the early part of 2018, an official said.“The State government had allocated Rs. 30 lakh for the statue in 2015 as a tribute to the legendary singer. Bhupen da is more an Arunachalee than an Assamese,” Director of Research Department Batem Pertin said.Bolung village is adjacent to Assam’s Sadiya area where his parents lived. He was often carried to the village by his elders. Later as a boy he also moved around the village frequently, an official said.Mr. Pertin said that the government in 2016-17 also allocated Rs. 70 lakh for erection of two statues of Hazarika at Yazali in Lower Subansiri district and Itanagar.Mr. Pertin, also the general secretary of the A.P. Literary Society, said that due to persuasion of the society, the government approved the Bolung project. “The land was donated by the sons of former MLA of Arunachal Pradesh Provisional Legislative Assembly Gora Pertin,” Mr. Pertin said.last_img read more