Utah Fan Tries To Make Fun Of Cal’s Academics, Makes Grammatical Error

first_imgUtah fan makes fun of Cal saying "if Marshawn Lynch can get into Cal than anyone can".marshawn lynch cal utah fan spelling errorESPN’s College GameDay is at Utah this week, and Utes fans have come up with some pretty clever signs ahead of their big Pac-12 contest against Cal Saturday night. The one you’ll see below is not one of them.A Utah fan, attempting to make fun of Cal’s academics and question former running back Marshawn Lynch’s intelligence, made a grammatical error. Check it out:SIGN RULE NO. 1: If you’re going to make fun of the other school’s academics, check your grammar. pic.twitter.com/sz8SBEVqOx— College GameDay (@CollegeGameDay) October 10, 2015Marshawn knows the difference between “than” and “then” #gameday pic.twitter.com/qhDoZMinx6— GoldenBlogs (@GoldenBlogs) October 10, 2015For the record, Cal is also one of the best public schools in the country. Major fail all around here.last_img read more

Smoking and drinking during pregnancy – stigma drives women to secrecy

first_imgFurther Reading Source:https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1871519218306085 By Dr. Ananya Mandal, MDFeb 12 2019A new study has found that because of the stigma around smoking and drinking during pregnancy, many women are doing these in private.Researchers from the University of Cardiff have noted that pregnant women are “irritated and alienated” by the perceived notions regarding the harmful effects of smoking and drinking during pregnancy. Recent figures have shown that one in five women from Wales smoke during their first pregnancy.This new study published in the journal Women and Birth reveals that women feel they receive health advice in a “judgemental tone” from their antenatal healthcare providers and midwives that make them reluctant to open up for advice and support during pregnancy regarding smoking and drinking. Some of the pregnant also reported feeling judged by their non-smoking partners. A significant number of women who were smokers or non-smokers agreed that smoking during pregnancy is acceptable if in private. They however condoned smoking in public. They felt that pregnant women who smoke in public receive a lot of negative judgement and criticism from those around them. E-cigarette smokers too felt judged, the study found.For this study the team of researchers interviewed 10 low income pregnant women belonging to deprived areas of south Wales. They were provided visual questionnaires and clues like timelines, collages and thought bubbles related activities. Image Credit: Napocska / Shutterstock Dr Aimee Grant, from Cardiff University’s Centre for Trials Research, in a statement said, “Moral judgements are commonly directed towards mothers through reference to health behaviour in pregnancy, and working-class mothers are particularly subject to this criticism, ignoring the challenges of living on a low income. Our study shows that these looks and comments – including by members of the public – irritate and alienate pregnant women, making them less likely to seek help. No one wants to be judged and shamed.” The authors of this study called for more “empathy” than judgement.The health advocates worldwide advice pregnant women to abstain from alcohol and smoking tobacco. There are over 4,000 chemicals present in cigarette smoke that can harm the unborn baby and also reduce the oxygen supply. The Chief Medical Officers for the UK makes similar recommendations for pregnant women. The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG) also added that there are no safe alcohol consumption limits during pregnancy.Dr Dunla Gallagher, one of the co-authors of the study says that smoking could be a “coping strategy” for some of the low-income, pregnant mothers. She said in a statement, “Rather than stigma, women need empathy and a recognition of the challenges that pregnancy can bring in terms of women’s independent choices.” Smoking and Pregnancy Effects of Passive Smoking on Children’s Health Carcinogens in Cigarette Smoke Everything You Need to Know About Giving Up Cigaretteslast_img read more

Care Not Killing poll Assisted suicide would fundamentally change doctorpatient relationship

first_imgFeb 14 2019Introducing physician-assisted suicide would fundamentally change the doctor-patient relationship, finds a major new poll for Care Not Killing.The survey of over 2,000 members of the public found high levels of concern about vulnerable people feeling pressure to end their lives with four in 10 saying changing the law risks normalizing suicide.The ComRes poll asked GB adults about their views on assisted suicide, the model used in Oregon, and how this would affect trust in doctors.Asked “If GPs are given the power to help patients commit suicide it will fundamentally change the relationship between a doctor and patient, since GPs are currently under a duty to protect and preserve lives,” more than twice as many said it would (48 per cent to 23 per cent), while nearly 3 in ten (29 per cent) were not sure.Dr Gordon MacDonald, a spokesman for Care Not Killing commented: The survey asked if legalizing assisted dying risks normalizing suicide and leading to an increase in deaths among the general population. The public were evenly split but almost four in ten (37 per cent) agreed, exactly the same proportion who disagreed – while a quarter were not sure. It concludes by asking if “as a society we ought to try to do everything we reasonably can to reduce the rate of suicides, especially among men who are three times as likely as women to take their own lives”. Eight in 10 agreed (78%), while perhaps surprisingly 6% disagree.Dr MacDonald, concluded: The poll found that most (51 per cent) of those surveyed were concerned that some people might feel pressured into accepting help to take their own life “so as not to be a burden on others”, while half that proportion (25 per cent) disagreed. These figures reflect what is happening in the US states of Oregon and Washington where a majority of those ending their lives in 2017 said that not wanting to be a burden was a motivation for their decision. This compared to just one in five (21 per cent) in those states who were concerned about the possibility of inadequate pain control, or were experiencing discomfort.The survey was commissioned in the wake of the decision by the Royal College of Physicians to survey their members about “assisted dying” and in a highly unusual move require a super-majority of 60 per cent to prevent the doctors group adopting a neutral position.  Asked if cases such as Dr Harold Shipman and the Gosport Hospital scandal made people more concerned that changing the law to allow doctors to prescribe lethal doses of a substance to kill terminally ill patients would fundamentally change the relationship between doctors and patients, more than four in 10 (42 per cent) agreed, 28 per cent disagreed and three in 10 (30 per cent) did not know.Related StoriesHow to get a cheaper prescription before leaving the doctor’s officeEven when HIV prevention drug is covered, other costs block treatmentAre physical examinations by family doctors still needed?The poll found high levels of concern about whether overstretched doctors have the time or clinical ability to accurately assess a patient’s mental capacity if they requested help to end their life.  Alarmingly, more than a quarter of adults (27 per cent), equivalent to 13.5 million patients, said that if assisted suicide were legal, “they would not trust their own GP enough for them to make a decision about their mental capacity to decide whether or not to accept help to take their own life.Dr MacDonald, continued: It is clear that ripping up the longstanding agreement between doctors and society that their job is to save life not to end it would have a seriously damaging effect on how the profession is viewed. In places like Oregon and Washington there have been reports of the sick being denied the life-saving and life-extending drugs they need but offered the poison to end their life. While in Belgium one study found more than 1,000 assisted deaths were without the explicit request of the patient.” This poll shows a greater level of understanding of the difficulties with assisted suicide than most so-called experts think possible. Usually the public are only asked a simple rights based question that is heavily framed, but these questions reveal significant unease around the removing universal protections to allow doctors to kill their patients.” This poll puts a sword to the lie that changing the law on assisted suicide enjoys unremitting support. Abandoning universal protections and expecting doctors to dispense lethal drugs with the express purpose of killing their patients causes alarm. It would undermine the doctor-patient relationship and, as large numbers of the public recognize, risks normalizing suicide.” Source: https://www.carenotkilling.org.uk/last_img read more

Mesothelioma patients twice as likely to survive when treated with high dose

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Apr 29 2019Mesothelioma patients are twice as likely to survive for two years or longer, if they are treated with a high dose of radiation to the affected side of the trunk, according to research presented at the ESTRO 38 conference.Mesothelioma is a rare but aggressive form of cancer that grows in the layers of tissues surrounding the lungs. It is usually caused by exposure to asbestos. Patients typically only live for a year or two following diagnosis and treatment options are very limited.The study looked at patients whose cancers could not be completely removed with surgery and the researchers say their findings have the potential to change treatment and outcomes for this group of patients.The study was led by Dr Marco Trovo MD, chief of the Radiation Oncology Department at University Hospital of Udine, Italy. He said: “There is an urgent need for more effective treatments for mesothelioma. Surgery can be given to these patients, but it is often impossible to remove all of the tumors.”Patients with mesothelioma are sometimes given radiotherapy to help control their symptoms. However, radiotherapy has evolved dramatically in the last few years so we wanted to see if it could now be used to prevent the cancer from spreading to nearby tissue, hopefully bringing improvements in survival.The study involved 108 patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma who were treated at the National Cancer Institute of Aviano, Italy, between 2014 and 2018. All were given surgery to remove some tumor tissue, followed by chemotherapy.Half were randomly assigned to receive radical hemi-thoracic radiotherapy, meaning the radiation was delivered to either the left or right side of their trunk, depending on where the tumor was located. This involved 25 treatments delivering a total dose of 50 Gy to the left or right side of the trunk, as well as an extra 60 Gy dose to the precise location of the tumor. The other patients received a more typical palliative form of radiotherapy. This involved five to ten treatments delivering a total dose of 20-30 Gy to the precise location of the tumor.Related StoriesAdult survivors of pediatric brain tumors may experience cognitive, socioeconomic burdensNew research uncovers mechanism behind the newest generation of cancer drugsRemoving asbestos from schools likely to increase cases of mesotheliomaOf the patients who received the aggressive radiotherapy treatment, 58% were still alive two years later. In the patients who received the palliative radiotherapy, 28% were still alive two years later.Around 20% of patients receiving radical hemi-thoracic radiotherapy suffered radiation pneumonitis (inflammation of the lung). Other sides effects included weakness, nausea and mild inflammation of the oesophagus.Dr Trovo said: “This research shows a clear survival benefit in using this type of radiotherapy for mesothelioma patients whose tumors can only partially be removed by surgery. We believe that this should be considered the new standard of care for these patients.”He hopes that even greater gains in survival could be made by treating patients with radiotherapy followed by targeted immunotherapy (where the body’s own immune system is encouraged to fight cancer cells).Professor Umberto Ricardi, President of ESTRO and head of the Department of Oncology at the University of Turin, Italy, who was not involved in the research, said: “This is an extremely positive result that brings good news to patients with this rare and difficult-to-treat cancer. To ensure these patients benefit from this type of treatment, it’s important that they are referred to a specialist cancer center with the right expertise and equipment to carefully plan and deliver the most effective radiotherapy treatment, and manage any side effects that occur.” Source:https://www.estro.org/last_img read more

Study finds substantial volume overload in kidney failure patients initiating peritoneal dialysis

first_imgWe intended to associate practices of peritoneal dialysis use of hypertonic exchanges, use of automated peritoneal dialysis vs. continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis, use of icodextrin, and use of diuretics with technique failure. Our main finding is that the association between technique failure and fluid overload is dependent upon center size and thus presumably experience within the treating center.”Wim Van Biesen, MD, PhD, University Hospital Ghent, Belgium Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)May 24 2019A new study published in CJASN found substantial volume overload, or too much fluid in the body, in patients with kidney failure who initiated peritoneal dialysis. Volume overload tended to improve over time after starting dialysis, but was at all times was higher in males vs. females and in patients with diabetes vs. those without. The study also revealed variations in practice of care across different geographic regions. This variation was associated with differences in degree of volume overload.Individuals with kidney failure who are undergoing hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis often experience fluid overload. To examine the implications of this condition, Wim Van Biesen, MD, PhD (University Hospital Ghent, in Belgium) and his colleagues designed a study to assess patients’ health and fluid volume over time after initiating peritoneal dialysis. It’s thought that actively managing volume overload may reduce the risk of technique failure (transfer from peritoneal dialysis to hemodialysis) and prolong patient survival.In the study of 1,054 patients from 28 countries who were examined every 3 months, volume overload before the start of dialysis amounted to an average of 1.9 L and decreased to 1.2 L during the first year. After 3 years of follow-up, the average relative volume overload in patients was lower than at the start in participants from all regions except those of Latin American, where it increased. The investigators concluded that volume overload is already present before the start of dialysis, and it tends to improve over the first 6 months and stabilize afterwards.At all time points, males and participants with diabetes were at a higher risk of experiencing volume overload. Also, volume overload was associated with a higher risk of premature death. The study revealed different treatment practices to address volume overload across dialysis centers and regions. Related StoriesResearchers identify trends in use of transcatheter dialysis conduit procedures over 15 yearsRapid fluid removal from patients with failing kidneys linked to increased risk of deathOne-fifth of U.S. surgeons still ‘overusing’ riskier method to create kidney dialysis access, study findsIn an accompanying Patient Voice editorial, Shari Gilford shared her experience of peritoneal dialysis, both ambulatory and automated, for 7 years. She also questioned why patients in Latin America had a different outcome than those from other regions.”If there are factors other than dialysate type, dialysate concentrate, or diet which make it more difficult for patients to control their volume overload, patients need to be made aware of this,” she wrote. “Based on my own experience [in hot vs. cold seasons], I wonder if the year-round hotter climate of Latin America, as opposed to most other regions in the study which have cold seasons, could have been a factor for fluid overload leading to increased mortality. Continued study of this variable might improve outcomes for peritoneal dialysis patients who live in warmer climes.”Source:American Society of NephrologyJournal reference:Biesen, W.V. et al. (2019) Evolution Over Time of Volume Status and PD-Related Practice Patterns in an Incident Peritoneal Dialysis Cohort. Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. doi.org/10.2215/CJN.11590918.last_img read more