Rivers are the world’s heritage. Time to treat them as such (commentary)

first_imgAmazon Dams, Commentary, Dams, Editorials, Environment, Hydroelectric Power, Hydropower, Mekong Dams, Researcher Perspective Series, Rivers, UNESCO World Heritage Site, World Heritage Convention Article published by Mike Gaworecki This July represents a critical opportunity to protect rivers and the World Heritage sites that depend on them. Key government leaders will converge on Baku, Azerbaijan for the 43rd annual meeting of the World Heritage Committee this week.Established under the auspices of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), the Committee is charged with protecting sites around the world deemed of the highest cultural and natural values. But oddly, no river has yet been directly protected by the Committee.Beyond protecting existing sites from harm, the World Heritage Committee needs to broaden its conception of what constitutes a natural site to recognize the intrinsic value of rivers, particularly free-flowing rivers, and the critical role they play in sustaining life.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. This July represents a critical opportunity to protect rivers and the World Heritage sites that depend on them.Key government leaders will converge on Baku, Azerbaijan for the 43rd annual meeting of the World Heritage Committee this week. Established under the auspices of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), the Committee is charged with protecting sites around the world deemed of the highest cultural and natural values. From Machu Picchu to the Great Barrier Reef, these sites represent some of our most precious common treasures. But oddly, no river has yet been directly protected by the Committee.That said, a key underlying theme of the meeting is the growing threat that dams pose to some of the world’s irreplaceable sites. This is the subject of a new report, “Heritage Dammed,” prepared by the Rivers Without Boundaries coalition with contributions from International Rivers (where I work as policy director) and many others. The report finds that over one-quarter of all natural World Heritage sites, including the iconic Lake Baikal in Russia and Serengeti National Park, are being impacted or threatened by water infrastructure such as dams.In recognition of this worsening trend, the World Heritage Committee passed a resolution in 2016 calling for the prohibition on dams within the boundaries of World Heritage sites, as well as for any dams indirectly impacting these sites to be “rigorously assessed.” While a welcome step, this has not prevented key sites from the worst impacts: Last year, Kenya’s Lake Turkana was finally added to the official list of sites in danger only after Ethiopia’s Gibe III Dam cut off flows into the lake, causing lake levels to drop precipitously and leading to extreme food insecurity for the hundreds of thousands of people subsisting off the lake.The sacred waterfalls on the Teles Pires River, Brazil. Photo by Christopher Borges, licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0.Against this backdrop, the issue of dams has come back into focus as a number of critical sites, profiled in the Heritage Dammed report, face renewed threats. These include:• The fate of the Selous Game Reserve in Tanzania — a world class biodiversity hotspot for African wildlife, including endangered species — that is set to be inundated by the planned Rufiji Dam. The plans have provoked an international outcry, prompting one of the world’s largest dam builders, China Three Gorges, to state publicly that it would not pursue the project because it would be located within a World Heritage site.• The future of the Mesopotamian Marshes in Iraq, which sustain important freshwater fisheries and a vibrant local culture, after the government of Turkey announced the completion of the Ilisu Dam near the headwaters of the Tigris River. Opponents around the world have rallied to contest plans to begin filling the reservoir, which would submerge the town of Hasankeyf — renowned for being continuously inhabited for the past 12,000 years — in the process. Filling of the reservoir has been postponed as a result, but the threat remains.• The Sumatran Rainforest site in Indonesia, officially listed as “In Danger” since 2011 over the construction of dams and other developments. The site has again emerged as a flashpoint in light of the discovery of the newly identified species, the Tapanuli orangutan, with only 800 remaining and at risk of extinction with a dam proposed in the middle of its only habitat. Plans to build the 510-megawatt Batang Toru Dam have been cast into doubt, however, as the Bank of China announced it would reevaluate its plans to finance the dam in light of sustained protest.Selous Game Reserve World Heritage Site, Tanzania. Photo by Greg Armfield.To proactively address the growing threat of dams, the report makes specific recommendations for how the Committee can improve the protection of rivers, including the use of preemptive strategic environmental assessments, among other precautionary measures.But beyond protecting existing sites from harm, the World Heritage Committee needs to broaden its conception of what constitutes a natural site to recognize the intrinsic value of rivers, particularly free-flowing rivers, and the critical role they play in sustaining life. Free-flowing rivers form the bedrock for local cultures and communities and have huge ecological significance, serving as the world’s last bastion of dwindling freshwater biodiversity. Indeed, a recent study by WWF found that dams are the biggest culprit in the 83 percent decline in freshwater biodiversity experienced globally between 1970 and 2014. Yet of the world’s 177 largest rivers, only one-third are free flowing, and just 21 rivers longer than 1000 kilometers retain an unobstructed connection to the sea.Many free-flowing rivers sit adjacent to existing World Heritage sites, but their values are not recognized or protected. For example, the actual river ecosystems of the Three Parallel Rivers of Yunnan heritage site in China are deliberately excluded from the protected area. They are now threatened again by the construction of mega-dams on all three rivers, including one of Asia’s last free-flowing rivers, the Nu-Salween, which originates in the Tibetan Plateau and flows through China and Myanmar. Still more of the world’s threatened rivers have no world heritage designation, from the mighty Congo River in Central Africa to the Karnali River, Nepal’s last, most pristine free-flowing river.While the world’s last free-flowing rivers are often subjected to reckless plans to harness them for their hydropower potential, the Baku meeting is also coming at a time of positive momentum as countries have begun to recognize the rights of rivers and river advocates lead campaigns to secure permanent legal protections for rivers. The World Heritage Committee should join this growing movement and take the lead in calling for free-flowing rivers to be protected and the nomination of iconic rivers as World Heritage sites.The Glen Canyon Dam on the Colorado River in the United States. Photo by Christian Mehlführer, licensed under CC BY 2.5.Josh Klemm is Policy Director for International Rivers.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Amazon infrastructure puts 68% of indigenous lands / protected areas at risk: report

first_img68 percent of the indigenous lands and protected natural areas in the nine nations encompassing the Amazon region are under pressure from roads, mining, dams, oil drilling, forest fires and deforestation, according to a new report by RAISG, the Amazonian Geo-referenced Socio-Environmental Information Network.Of the 6,345 indigenous territories located within the nine Amazonian countries surveyed, 2,042 (32 percent) are threatened or pressured by two types of infrastructure activities, while 2,584 (41 percent) are threatened or pressured by at least one. Only 8 percent of the total are not threatened or pressured at all.In the case of the 692 protected natural areas in the Amazon region, 193 (28 percent) suffer three kinds of threat or pressure, and 188 (27 percent) suffer threats or pressure from two activities.“These are alarming numbers: 43 percent of the protected natural areas and 19 percent of the indigenous lands are under three or more types of pressure or threat,” said Júlia Jacomini, a researcher with the ISA, Instituto Socioambiental, an NGO and RAISG partner. Already completed and proposed infrastructure projects, along with infrastructure investment plans, either directly threaten or put pressure on 68 percent of the indigenous lands and protected natural areas in the Amazon region, according to a newly published report prepared by the Amazonian Geo-referenced Socio-Environmental Information Network (RAISG), a group of specialists from NGOs and other organizations within six Amazon region countries.The data sets are presented in the form of six maps, each corresponding to an infrastructure-related activity or practice present in the Amazon, including transport (ie. roads), energy (ie. hydroelectric dams), mining, oil, deforestation and fires. The 2019 edition takes account of development in the headwaters of Amazonian rivers, information not included in past reports. The nine nations evaluated are Brazil, Venezuela, Colombia, Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador, Guiana, Suriname and French Guiana.RAISG reveals that, of the 6,345 indigenous territories located within the nine Amazonian countries surveyed, that 2,042 (32 percent) are threatened or pressured by two types of infrastructure activities, while 2,584 (41 percent) are threatened or pressured by at least one. Only 8 percent of the total are not threatened or pressured at all.In the case of the 692 protected natural areas in the region, 193 (28 percent) suffer three kinds of threat or pressure, and 188 (27 percent) suffer threats or pressure from two activities.“These are alarming numbers: 43 percent of the protected natural areas and 19 percent of the indigenous lands are under three or more types of pressure or threat. The data demonstrate that the implementation of infrastructure works in the region clash with the way of life of the people in those areas, as well as [with] the preservation of both,” said Júlia Jacomini, a researcher with the ISA, Instituto Socioambiental, an NGO and RAISG partner.last_img read more

Two ferns presumed extinct found on remote Australian mountaintops

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Environment, Forests, Green, Happy-upbeat Environmental, New Species, Plants, Research, Species Discovery Researchers have rediscovered two species of ferns on the mountaintops of Queensland, Australia, that were last seen more than 50 years ago and presumed extinct.The ferns, Hymenophyllum whitei and Oreogrammitis leonardii, were found on Thornton Peak and Mount Finnigan respectively during an expedition in August 2017.Researchers recommend listing both species as endangered in Queensland because they occur over a very limited area. On the remote mountaintops of Queensland, Australia, researchers have rediscovered two species of ferns last seen more than 50 years ago.One of the ferns, Hymenophyllum whitei, was first recorded by botanist Cyril Tenison White in 1937 on Thornton Peak, one of Queensland’s highest points, located in the Daintree rainforest. Since then, despite repeated searches, researchers didn’t find the fern — that is, until a group of botanists set out on yet another plant survey in August 2017.During this expedition, on the way to Thornton Peak, the researchers from the Royal Botanic Garden Sydney finally spotted H. whitei peeking out from a boulder on the side of the track, according to a new study.“At first we struggled to convince ourselves that ‘this was it,’ but upon closer examination, we knew it couldn’t be anything else, so we allowed ourselves to get completely ecstatic about it,” Matt Renner, a co-author of the study and one of the botanists on the expedition, said in a statement.The expedition team on Thornton Peak in northern Queensland’s Daintree rainforest. Image by Matt Renner/Royal Botanic Garden Sydney.In dry weather, the small fern completely desiccates and shrivels up, retracting into the surrounding flora like mosses, the researchers write, until it’s nearly undetectable. When moisture is available again, the fern re-expands. “This may in part explain the long period between collections of this species,” the researchers add.Renner and his colleagues say that because H. whitei occurs in a very limited area and is found only within Daintree National Park, the species should be listed as endangered in Queensland.Hymenophyllum whitei fern. Image by Matt Renner/Royal Botanic Garden Sydney.Like H. whitei, the fern Oreogrammitis leonardii was previously known from a single collection by Australian-American naturalist Leonard John Brass in 1948, from a yet another remote summit, Mount Finnigan in northeastern Queensland.Nearly 70 years later, during the 2017 survey, Renner and his colleagues found the fern again, growing on a tree trunk close to the ground, surrounded by the leafy liverwort Acroscyphella phoenicorhiza.“We made some collections of ferns from a tree trunk that fit the description, but it wasn’t until we were back in Cairns that Dr. Barbara Parris, who described the species, confirmed we had rediscovered Oreogrammitis leonardii,” Renner said.For O. leonardii, too, the researchers recommended a conservation status of endangered, “because of its limited distribution and the small area of potential high-elevation forested habitat around the summit complex of Mount Finnigan.”Oreogrammitis leonardii fern. Image by Matt Renner/Royal Botanic Garden Sydney.Citation:Field, A. R., & Renner, M. A. (2019). Rediscovered or reconsidered: the presumed extinct ferns and lycophytes of tropical Queensland, Australia. Australian Systematic Botany, 32(3), 111-122. doi:10.1071/sb18024center_img Article published by Shreya Dasguptalast_img read more

Indigenous-managed lands found to harbor more biodiversity than protected areas

first_imgAmphibians, Animals, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Birds, Conservation, Environment, Indigenous Communities, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Mammals, Protected Areas, Reptiles, Research, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation Article published by Mike Gaworecki Researchers say they found that amphibian, bird, mammal, and reptile abundance in Australia, Brazil, and Canada is highest on lands managed or co-managed by indigenous communities — higher even than on protected areas like parks and wildlife reserves, which were found to have the second highest levels of biodiversity.Both indigenous-managed lands and protected areas harbored more biodiversity than unprotected areas included in the study that the researchers selected at random. The researchers also determined that the size and geographical location of any particular area had no effect on levels of species diversity, suggesting that it’s the land-management practices of indigenous communities that are conserving biodiversity.The researchers said their results demonstrate the importance of expanding the boundaries of traditional conservation strategies, which frequently rely on establishing protected areas to conserve critical habitat for biodiversity. New research bolsters the case for indigenous-led land management as a crucial conservation solution.The study, published in the journal Environmental Science & Policy last month, focused on land and species data from more than 15,000 distinct geographical regions in Australia, Brazil, and Canada. After analyzing the data, the researchers behind the study say they found that amphibian, bird, mammal, and reptile abundance is highest on lands managed or co-managed by indigenous communities — higher even than on protected areas like parks and wildlife reserves, which were found to have the second highest levels of biodiversity.Both indigenous-managed lands and protected areas harbored more biodiversity than unprotected areas included in the study that the researchers selected at random. The researchers also determined that the size and geographical location of any particular area had no effect on levels of species diversity.“This suggests that it’s the land-management practices of many Indigenous communities that are keeping species numbers high,” Richard Schuster, who led the research while at the University of British Columbia (UBC) and is now a postdoctoral fellow at Carleton University in Canada, said in a statement. He added that a key takeaway of the study is that “Going forward, collaborating with Indigenous land stewards will likely be essential in ensuring that species survive and thrive.”Schuster and co-authors say that their study is the first to look at land management practices and their impact on biodiversity at such a large geographic scale. “We looked at three countries with very different climates and species, to see if the pattern held true across these different regions — and it did,” study co-author Ryan Germain, a postdoctoral fellow at Cornell University in the US, said in a statement. “From frogs and songbirds right up to large mammals like grizzly bears, jaguars and kangaroos, biodiversity was richest in Indigenous-managed lands.”UBC forestry professor Peter Arcese, who served as senior author for the study, said that the results demonstrate the importance of expanding the boundaries of traditional conservation strategies, which frequently rely on establishing protected areas to conserve critical habitat for biodiversity.A 2018 study found that the amount of land afforded some sort of protected status has roughly doubled globally since the 1992 Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. More than 202,000 protected areas now cover nearly 15 percent of the world’s terrestrial areas, according to the study, but one-third of those protected areas are facing “intense human pressure.” Given these findings, conservationists have argued that indigenous stewardship is vital to the success of the world’s protected areas, as well.Yet many protected areas established in the past intentionally excluded indigenous peoples from using the land they had relied on for generations. This was not only harmful to those local indigenous communities, it also meant that the protected areas frequently failed to achieve their conservation goals, Arcese and team noted.“Protected areas are a cornerstone of biodiversity conservation globally, but current levels of protection will be insufficient to halt the planetary extinction crisis,” Arcese said. “We must manage a larger fraction of world’s area in ways that protect species and leads to positive outcomes for people and the species they’ve relied on for millennia.”Another study released last year determined that indigenous peoples have ownership and use or management rights over more than one-fourth of Earth’s land surface (close to 38 million square kilometers or about 14.6 million square miles) across 87 countries. The study, which mapped all of the terrestrial lands managed or owned by indigenous peoples across the globe, also found that about 40 percent of all terrestrial protected areas on Earth overlap with indigenous-controlled land — and that about two-thirds of indigenous lands are still essentially in their natural state, more than double the proportion of intactness found on other types of land.“Indigenous-managed lands represent an important repository of biodiversity in three of the largest countries on Earth, and Indigenous peoples currently manage or have tenure to roughly one-quarter of the planet’s land area,” Nick Reo, an associate professor at Dartmouth College in the US and co-author of the present study, said in a statement.“In light of this, collaborating with Indigenous governments, communities and organizations can help to conserve biodiversity as well as support Indigenous rights to land, sustainable resource use and well-being.”The Maasai people in Kenya pass down environmental knowledge through storytelling. Photo by Joan de la Malla.CITATIONS• Garnett, S. T. et al. (2018). A spatial overview of the global importance of Indigenous lands for conservation. Nature Sustainability. doi:10.1038/s41893-018-0100-6• Jones, K. R., Venter, O., Fuller, R. A., Allan, J. R., Maxwell, S. L., Negret, P. J., & Watson, J. E. (2018). One-third of global protected land is under intense human pressure. Science, 360(6390), 788-791. doi:10.1126/science.aap9565• Schuster, R., Germain, R. R., Bennett, J. R., Reo, N. J., & Arcese, P. (2019). Vertebrate biodiversity on indigenous-managed lands in Australia, Brazil, and Canada equals that in protected areas. Environmental Science & Policy, 101, 1-6. doi:10.1016/j.envsci.2019.07.002FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

It’s time for Climate Bonds Initiative to scrap its hydro certification scheme (commentary)

first_imgAs world leaders, industry groups, and campaigners converge on Madrid for the climate change COP, the proponents of hydropower are out in full force, keen to profit from and perpetuate the myth of hydropower’s climate benefits.The Climate Bonds Initiative (CBI), a UK-based entity established to channel private finance toward addressing climate change, has aligned itself with the influential International Hydropower Association in its eagerness to capitalize on the growing market for climate-certified projects. Yet it has bitten off more than it can chew by attempting to certify hydropower projects, which prompted 276 civil society groups to call for the scheme to be abandoned.Climate bonds have the potential to play a critical role in ensuring positive outcomes for rivers and for effectively mitigating climate change. Clinging to its ill-advised pursuit of a hydropower standard, however, would damage the CBI’s own reputation and undermine the credibility of green bonds on the whole.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. The world urgently needs to embrace effective financial incentives to arrest the climate crisis, but attempts to greenwash hydropower are counterproductive and must be abandoned.As world leaders, industry groups, and campaigners converge on Madrid for the climate change COP, the proponents of hydropower are out in full force, keen to profit from and perpetuate the myth of hydropower’s climate benefits. Some are those you’d expect, like the International Hydropower Association (IHA), which is sidling up to solar and wind industry representatives to bask in their reflected glory. Others are less visible, yet present no less a threat to our rivers and meaningful action on climate change.The Climate Bonds Initiative (CBI), a UK-based entity established to channel private finance toward addressing climate change, is presenting its work at no less than nine events in Madrid. CBI staff are busy promoting their bond certification services, which aim to serve as a benchmark for the emerging set of climate bond financing mechanisms. Yet by attempting to certify hydropower projects in its eagerness to capitalize on the growing market for climate-certified projects, the CBI has bitten off more than it can chew. And it’s triggered a major backlash.Today, 276 civil society organizations from 77 countries around the world launched a statement calling upon CBI to “abandon its misguided attempt to greenwash hydropower.” This diverse array of groups — from established human rights and environmental advocates to localized initiatives fighting to protect their communities’ freshwater resources — are unified in opposing CBI’s plans to “[channel] scarce climate dollars toward projects that fail to help us confront the challenge of preventing a 2oC scenario.”The CBI’s major misstep was aligning itself with and taking its cues from the influential International Hydropower Association, an industry lobby created to promote the interests of hydro companies. CBI’s proposed criteria are flawed, as the unanswered written submission by International Rivers (where I work as policy director) describes in detail, and rely almost exclusively on a set of tools designed and promoted by the IHA, which would mean in practice that:• Adverse environmental and social impacts, which are rife in the sector and well-documented, would be covered only in a cursory way using the IHA’s own risk tool. This amounts to largely a box-ticking exercise where there are no requirements for assessors — who would themselves be accredited by the IHA in a glaring conflict of interest — to even consult with affected communities.• Greenhouse gas emissions from dam reservoirs (primarily methane, a particularly potent greenhouse gas) would be calculated using the IHA’s own tool, which systematically underestimates GHG emissions from dams. Meanwhile, CBI’s proposed criteria set such a low bar that even high-emitting dams would qualify.• Most fundamentally, the proposed criteria, if adopted, would permit institutional investors like pension funds to invest in hydropower with no real limits. Not only would it incentivize and make hydro projects more profitable for operators, it would certify dubious projects without achieving any meaningful climate benefit.Climate bonds have the potential to play a critical role in ensuring positive outcomes for rivers and for effectively mitigating climate change. In fact, the CBI previously created a separate standard for water infrastructure, which took an important step to promote nature-based solutions to addressing climate change. Clinging to its ill-advised pursuit of a hydropower standard, on the other hand, would damage the CBI’s own reputation and undermine the credibility of green bonds on the whole.The Climate Bonds Initiative would do well to disentangle itself from its alliance with the International Hydropower Association and scrap its hydropower certification scheme.Protest in Paris outside World Hydropower Congress, May 14, 2019. Photo Credit: Todd Southgate.Josh Klemm is the Policy Director at the global advocacy group International Rivers where he oversees campaigns to shift public and private investment away from destructive dams and toward sustainable energy and water solutions. International Rivers works to protect rivers and defend the rights of the communities that depend on them.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Activism, Climate Change and Dams, Commentary, Dams, Editorials, Environment, Freshwater Ecosystems, Hydroelectric Power, Hydropower, Researcher Perspective Series, Rivers, Water center_img Article published by Mike Gaworeckilast_img read more

From trash to cash: How a Thai entrepreneur turned used flip-flops into a sustainable business model

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored A university team in Thailand named “Tlejourn” has created a profitable product from discarded flip-flops. Of the 5.25 trillion pieces of trash floating in the ocean, old flip-flops are one of the most commonly found items.Although flip-flops are not recyclable, Tlejourn upcycles them into new, solid mats, which are then use to make new footware. Tlejourn’s footwear is handmade by low-income families in southern Thailand, providing them with a significant financial boost.With Tlejourn’s help, Thai shoe manufacturer Nanyang created a new product line of sandals made from discarded flip-flops. Inspired by Tlejourn’s success, other trash collecting initiatives, like Trash Hero, now experiment to find other ways to turn trash into cash. One day in mid-2015, Dr. Nattapong Nithi-Uthai, who goes by the nickname “Arm,” looked at the pile of flip-flops in his backyard. Some 100,000 of them were stacked up waist high behind his house in Pattani, on the coast of southern Thailand. The flip-flops laid there undisturbed for months. A family of venomous snakes even built a nest inside.Arm wanted to reuse the flip-flops, but he also wanted to produce a product that made money at the same time. After many months and several prototypes, he still didn’t have a winning product. Arm thrived on challenges, but this time he seemed stuck with his flip-flop mountain.Arm’s breakthrough finally came in January 2016. Since then, he and his team, which includes Padinya Aree, Maradee Baka, and Ruslan Masae, have profitably reused thousands of old flip-flops, turning them into new shoes. They call their nonprofit project “Tlejourn,” a Thai play on words for traveling shoes.Their success came after Arm and the Tlejourn team solved several challenges. First, because flip-flops can’t be melted down and recycled, they devised a low-tech, inexpensive way to upcycle old flip-flops by grinding them into small pieces and then gluing them together into one solid piece. Second, Arm convinced the volunteer group Trash Hero to give him all the flip-flops they found while cleaning up the local beach. With this, he had a free supply of flip-flops to upcycle. Third, Arm and his team finally hit upon upcycled shoes as their winning product.Selling new Tlejourn shoes at 399 Baht ($13.32) per pair generated enough of a profit margin to make the project worth it. Since then, Tlejourn’s team has made over 3,000 pairs of new, upcycled shoes.An estimated 5.25 trillion pieces of trash weighing nearly 270,000 tons are currently floating in the ocean. Discarded flip-flops may account for more than 25 percent, some 1.3 trillion flip-flops, if surveys from beach clean-ups are an accurate indicator.Dr. Nattapong Nithi-Uthai (nicknamed “Arm”) created a process and a network to profitably upcycle old flip-flops into new shoes. Photo by Ryan Anders.From his own experience, Arm guesses that there are enough old flip-flops collected in every five kilograms (11 pounds) of beach trash to make one new pair of Tlejourn shoes. That means that Tlejourn’s 3,000 pairs of new shoes equate to 15,000 kilograms (33,000 pounds) of ocean debris picked up on the beach.While the total amount of trash upcycled for Arm’s new shoes might not seem remarkable, his entrepreneurial journey certainly is. In fact, how Arm and team achieved success is a model already being imitated by others who want to profit from trash.The business challenge: How to beat trashIn 2011, Arm was 39, had earned a Ph.D. in the United States, and was on the staff of the Department of Rubber Technology and Polymer Science at the Prince of Songkhla University (PSU) in Pattani. In his free time, he ran, cycled, and helped out at his family’s business. Although he didn’t care about the environment at the time, a friend asked if he could upcycle some old flip-flops found on the beach. Accepting the challenge, Arm said, “Of course. It’s easy!”There are an estimated 5.25 trillion pieces of trash weighing nearly 270,000 tons floating in the ocean. Photo by Ryan Anders.He took the old flip-flops and a “can-do” attitude to his university laboratory. There, he and his team began to experiment. They washed the dirt off the trashed flip-flops and then ran them through a grinding machine. When the flip-flop pieces were all about the size of a kernel of corn, Arm poured in a polyurethane binder. The binder functioned as a glue and made the small pieces stick to each other. Finally, the team made a “sandwich” by spreading the flip-flop mixture (with the consistency of chunky peanut butter) in-between two heavy metal plates. This “sandwich” was squeezed together in a hot press, resulting in a solid but flexible mat about the size of an A3 piece of paper and 4 centimeters (a little over 1.5 inches) thick.Figuring out what to make and sell from the upcycled mats proved to be harder than Arm initially expected. “I always have in mind, these things need to be turned into a product. Someone needs to pay me to turn this into a product.” From 2011 to 2015, the team tried blocks, floor tiles, and even an exercise mat, but none of these product ideas seemed commercially viable.In January 2015, as Arm was testing out product ideas, a massive beach clean-up organized by a group of Thai and foreign volunteers calling themselves “Trash Hero” was underway. Over a four-month period, Trash Hero volunteers camped out on Thailand’s uninhabited Tarutao Island and collected garbage. One of the first volunteers, Roman Peter, decided to sort the flip-flops out. Peter said the Trash Hero team hoped that “they might find someone who could reuse them.” His hunch was right. By the time the clean-up had finished in April 2015, Arm was waiting for them at the pier. He had seen Trash Hero’s posts on Facebook and come with a large trailer truck to carry the mountain of flip-flops back to Pattani.Old flip-flops are first ground up into small pieces in order to upcycle them into solid mats. Photo by Tlejourn.In December 2015, Arm and his team had finally found a winning product. His students had chosen to make shoes for a competition in Bangkok. Each person on the team tore apart a new pair of shoes, stamped out a new shoe sole from the upcycled mat and then put their “green” prototype shoes back together.They dreamed up a brand name, Tlejourn. Days after posting pictures online, news of the Tlejourn project went viral in Thailand. Hundreds of people contacted Arm wanting to place an order. The team didn’t have the capital to mass-produce hundreds of shoes, so in 2016, they started a crowdfunding campaign. Customers paid in advance while Arm’s team struggled to fulfill the orders. Tlejourn had grown beyond a small student project, leading Arm to expand the team.The Tlejourn project uses shoe soles made from upcycled flip-flop mats. Photo by Tlejourn.Scaling up the businessIn early 2017, Arm visited a rural village some 30 minutes outside of Pattani. There, he was greeted by Mrs. Supatra Cometan. From her family’s wooden house, surrounded by rice fields, rubber tree plantations, and a mosque, Supatra leads a 10-person collective of women sewing shirts, small bags, and handicrafts.Arm asked Supatra and team not only to sew a decorative bag, which he would use instead of plastic packaging to ship Tlejourn’s orders, but also to assemble Tlejourn’s shoes. Despite Supatra’s reservations — and surprise that the sandal was made of trash — she and her group agreed.At the university, Arm’s team stamped shoe soles at his lab and then went to the village to train the women to assemble the shoes. ”We made many mistakes,” said Supatra, but they kept practicing and simply sent malformed parts back to Arm’s lab, where they were put back into the grinder.A member of Tlejourn’s team stamps out new shoe soles at Dr. Nithi-Uthai’s university, Prince of Songkhla University, in Pattani, Thailand. Photo by Tlejourn.That year, 2017, Supatra’s four-woman shoe team made 574 pairs of Tlejourn sandals. That number increased to 809 pairs in 2018, and is already nearing 1,000 in 2019. In addition, the sewing collective has produced some 3,000 cloth bags over the last three years. Arm not only found a way to get Tlejourn’s shoes made but also to benefit these village women, some of whom had never been employed or worked outside of their homes before.Since 2015, the Tlejourn team has also supported companies and one shoe school to incorporate upcycled flip-flops into their own products. Most recently, Tlejourn worked with Nanyang, one of Thailand’s oldest shoe brands, to create its own upcycled sandal, the “KHYA” (a Thai play on words for trash). When Nanyang’s limited-run sandals launched in September 2019, the company was initially prepared to make 10,000 pairs. Online demand was so strong, however, that after just three weeks, Nanyang had sold 27,886 pairs of upcycled KHYA sandals.The additional income earned from assembling Tlejourn’s shoes makes a real difference for women living near Pattani. The majority of families in this area can’t afford a new refrigerator if their old one breaks. Photo by Ryan Anders.Upcycling trash profits othersThere are multiple positive outcomes from the Tlejourn project. Household incomes for the women assembling Tlejourn shoes have increased by approximately 15 percent. That increase in income is significant. The majority of families in the area couldn’t afford a new refrigerator if their old one broke. Additionally, Supatra says that the project has boosted the women’s self-esteem and their awareness of trash in their own small community.Trash Hero, which points to Tlejourn as one of their success stories, has now grown to over 120 chapters. Tlejourn’s success has also inspired other Trash Hero chapters to search for ways to upcycle trash. In Indonesia, Trash Hero Gili Meno reuses Styrofoam to fill beanbag chairs and pillows.Since its founding in 2014, the nonprofit organization Trash Hero has grown to include 120 chapters, mainly in Southeast Asia. Photo by Tlejourn.Nanyang in Thailand is studying how to switch from plastic to biodegradable packaging and how to create a profitable, long-term business model for their KHYA sandals. The initial KHYA production run required three additional, costly steps compared to their normal flip-flops, but Mr. Piya Sosothikul, a member of Nanyang’s Board of Directors, sees a path to profitability. “If you do about 100,000 [annually], the price would not have to go up that high. It would have to go up to 600 Baht.”Flip-flops still wash ashore in Pattani, and although the Tlejourn project hasn’t totally changed that fact, it has completely altered Arm. “I was like zero percent green at the start,” he said, but picking up trash every week “is really powerful and it slowly changes you bit by bit.”Now Arm feels empowered. Instead of waiting for the government to take action, he believes he can tackle any problem. He’s even started a refill store called “Zero Waste Pattani.” From the ground floor at his home, Arm and his family sell shampoo, soap and washing detergent to customers who bring their own reusable containers. “I think we can change people who join us, and slowly we can change people around them. Slowly we can change the community.”Tlejourn’s shoes are assembled by an all-women team in rural southern Thailand. Earnings from the project raise their household income by approximately 15%. Photo by Ryan Anders.Citations• Bouwman, H., Evans, S. W., Cole, N., Yive, N. S. C. K., & Kylin, H. (2016). The flip-or-flop boutique: Marine debris on the shores of St Brandon’s rock, an isolated tropical atoll in the Indian Ocean. Marine environmental research, 114, 58-64. doi:10.1016/j.marenvres.2015.12.013• Eriksen, M., Lebreton, L. C., Carson, H. S., Thiel, M., Moore, C. J., Borerro, J. C., … & Reisser, J. (2014). Plastic pollution in the world’s oceans: more than 5 trillion plastic pieces weighing over 250,000 tons afloat at sea. PloS one, 9(12), e111913. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0111913FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Conservation, Environment, Green Business, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Pollution, Recycling, Sustainability, Technology And Conservation center_img Article published by Mike Gaworeckilast_img read more

Bolsonaro’s Brazil: 2019 brings death by 1,000 cuts to Amazon — part one

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Agriculture, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Cattle, Cattle Pasture, Cattle Ranching, Conservation, Controversial, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Crime, Environmental Politics, Featured, Forests, Green, Illegal Logging, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Industrial Agriculture, Land Conflict, Land Grabbing, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Saving The Amazon, Threats To The Amazon, Transparency, Tropical Deforestation While the media focused in 2019 on Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro’s incendiary remarks, or on the Amazon fires, he has quietly instituted new policies likely to aid land grabbers and do great harm to Amazon forests, indigenous and traditional peoples. “Death by 1,000 Cuts” parts 1 and 2 reviews those policies.Executive decree MP 910 issued December 11 legalizes large-scale land grabbing. The large-owner loophole built into the new decree allows land speculators to register large swathes of public lands that they grabbed before December 2018, using the illegal deforestation they accomplished as proof of their “occupation.”MP 910 could transfer 40-60 million hectares of public land to private owners who would then be authorized to legally deforest a fifth of that land, about 10 million hectares, experts say. MP 910 is likely to trigger high rates of conflict and deforestation. Congress must approve MP 910 in 120 days to make it permanent.The agriculture ministry also chose to make secret part of its ranching database, thwarting Visipec, an NGO-designed tool for tracking cattle raised on calving ranches where major deforestation occurs. Other administrative measures benefit big agribusiness over small family farms, and muzzle civil society voices. Logging trucks lacking license plates remove trees illegally harvested from an indigenous reserve in Pará state, Brazil. Image by Sue Branford / Mongabay.Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro is a man of incendiary words and big gestures. As such, he has attracted the attention of global media who cover his major outbursts and policy initiatives, as he pledges to open indigenous reserves to mining and agribusiness, and as he dismantles environmental and social agencies, firing those who oppose him.But over recent months Bolsonaro has quietly announced a flurry of measures that, while flying under the media radar, are making it easy for land grabbers to acquire large tracts of land in Amazonia — paving the way for the elite owners of garimpos (artisanal mines), and transnational mining companies to move into indigenous reserves and other protected areas.At the same time, the government has brought all agrarian reform to a standstill and halted altogether the previously snail-slow process of demarcating land occupied by indigenous and traditional populations — boundary marking guaranteed under the 1988 Constitution.These administrative changes, announced piecemeal, add up to a major shake-up regarding land tenure, and result in a drastic tipping of the never-level playing field, benefiting the wealthy and powerful. This restructuring is also emerging as potentially the most substantial anti-environmental policy shift since the military dictatorship, which ended in 1985 — making it the biggest threat to the Brazilian Amazon and its people.This is the first of two articles in which Mongabay surveys these measures representing a death by 1,000 cuts. This first piece concentrates mainly on the benefits to land speculators, while the second will largely cover mining.An IBAMA environmental agency agent looks out over devastated rainforest within Jamanxim National Forest in Pará state Brazil. Under Bolonsaro’s executive decree MP 910, this illegal deforestation could be used as proof of “occupation” by land grabbers to lay claim to the public lands which they invaded. Image courtesy of IBAMA.MP 910: Legalized land grabbingAfter months of rumor that a major land tenure measure was imminent, Bolsonaro finally issued executive decree MP 910 on December 11.The decree, which Bolsonaro pledges will end land chaos, especially in the Amazon, is cloaked in a promise to benefit the thousands of peasant families who have long occupied public land, some arriving in the 1970s with the encouragement of the military government. Finally, they will find it easy to register their small plots, Bolsonaro said, which means they’ll be able to obtain bank loans so as to increase agricultural production.The executive measure is already in force, but under Brazilian law must be approved by Congress within 120 days or cease to be valid. With the bancada ruralista agribusiness lobby dominant in the legislature, passage of MP 910 seems almost certain.The government estimates that the measure will lead to the registration of some 300,000 properties, 86% of them in Amazonia by the National Institute of Agrarian Reform and Colonization (INCRA).However, there’s more here than meets the eye, say analysts. Even though many small landholders may be beneficiaries, a closer look at the decree reveals a hidden agenda. Those smallholders, while large in number, only occupy a small portion of total claimed land. The real winners will be large-scale farmers, including many elite wealthy land grabbers. Although these ruralists make up only a small minority of beneficiaries, they’ll become legal owners of the largest amount of land by far.The large-owner loophole built into the new decree is, according to experts, an open invitation for land speculators to register large swathes of public lands that they illegally grabbed before December 2018. Building on land tenure decrees issued first by President Lula in 2009 and then by President Temer in 2017, MP 910 permits land grabbers to seize land, deforest it and then register it as theirs.Deforestation for soy in the Brazilian Amazon. Image by Rhett A. Butler / Mongabay.At the heart of the loophole: a term known as “self-declaration.” Before the decree was published, Luiz Antônio Nabham Garcia, a leading ruralist and the powerful federal Secretary of Land Affairs, noted that the new land rule would be based on “self-declaration” or autodeclaração, a process that allows would-be landowners, based only on their say-so, to declare the size of their properties, without need for independent verification on the ground.The only way the government will check these claims is through satellite imaging, accepting as “proof of occupation” deforestation carried out before December 2018 — deforestation on public land which was completely illegal at the time. Put simply, MP 910 legitimizes the theft of public lands by asking land grabbers for proof of an illegal act they committed in the past as grounds for the legalization of a land claim today.Even before MP 910 was issued, “self-declaration” was extremely controversial. In October, Bolsonaro sacked INCRA head General João Carlos Jesus Corrêa, because he had become “a thorn in the side” of Nabham over the issue. Successor, Geraldo Melo Filho, is aligned with the ruralists.Corrêa wasn’t alone. The Federal Audit Court (TCU), a powerful government body that monitors the federal government’s accounts, expressed disquiet that the expedited procedure would invite abuse. The government responded by keeping the policy intact but banning the use of the term “autodeclaração.”These logs, illegally cut on conserved land, were seized in an IBAMA raid in 2017. Under Bolsonaro, such raids have been greatly reduced, giving land grabbers a largely free rein. Image courtesy of IBAMA.Environmentalists sound the alarmRaul Valle, Director of Socioenvironmental Justice at WWF-Brasil, says that the measure will not only reward land grabbers for past actions, but encourages further land grabbing, as it creates the expectation that it will be easy to register land stolen today. “It rewards the strongest, as they get the land title,” he said.According to some analysts, the decree will probably lead to the handing over of between 40-60 million hectares (145,000-232,000 square miles) of public land to private landowners. These new owners will then be authorized to legally deforest a fifth of that land, about 10 million hectares (39,000 square miles), though part of this area may already be cleared. The figure will probably be much higher, if illegal deforestation is included. MP 910 is likely to trigger extremely high rates of violence and deforestation, equivalent, critics say, to that caused by Amazon highway construction by Brazil’s military government in the 1970s.Writing in El País, the journalist, Eliane Brum, expects that land speculators will use force to seize land occupied by peasant families that land thieves covet. In fact, this is already happening, she says. In Anapu, the town in Pará state where American nun, Dorothy Stang, was murdered in 2005, two rural leaders were killed this month. Lax law enforcement in the Amazon under Bolsonaro is likely to exacerbate conflict, as will the president’s incendiary remarks critical of indigenous groups and traditional communities that critics say emboldens ruralists to commit violence.Brum warns: “If congress doesn’t stop this decree, Amazonia will become a forest of corpses. Not of trees, but of people.”Cattle ranching is the primary driver of deforestation in Brazil’s Amazon basin today. By making a portion of Brazil’s cattle tracking database secret, the federal government has effectively thwarted NGO efforts to track ranching linked to illegal deforestation. Image © Henrique Manreza courtesy of The Nature Conservancy.Promoting agribusinessBesides legitimizing large-scale land grabbing, the Bolsonaro government has taken other measures to encourage the expansion of agribusiness in the Amazon.It has revoked a decree that forbade the expansion of sugarcane into sensitive areas, like the Pantanal wetlands and Amazonia — a policy that environmentalists fear will drive deforestation.In another discreet move, the agriculture ministry decided that part of its database will no longer be publicly available because it contains “personal information” that “does not interest the general public.” This seemingly innocuous move will have significant consequences, preventing the tracking of cattle from calving ranches (where major deforestation occurs) to cattle laundering farms (where no tree loss occurs), before the adult animals are sold to slaughterhouses.The newly announced database secrecy will thwart Visipec, a recently developed system to track the movement of cattle from origin to meat processing plant, created by University of Wisconsin researchers working in cooperation with the National Wildlife Federation.Though the tracking tool has the potential to reduce deforestation from the meat supply chain and the National Wildlife Federation has offered Visipec free to meatpackers, none, including the biggest, JBS, has accepted the offer. Now that Bolsonaro has shut down public access to cattle data, Visipec won’t work.As The New York Times pointed out, the tracking tool would have closed “what some experts suggest has been a convenient loophole for all parties in the Brazilian cattle industry.” Keeping the cattle deforestation loophole wide open makes life easier for meatpackers while foiling environmentalists.In another move, the government has made it harder to impose fines on buyers of illegal timber. Until Eduardo Bim, the president of IBAMA, altered regulations in November, buyers could be fined by IBAMA, Brazil’s environmental agency, if they bought timber illegally extracted from protected areas and indigenous units.Now fines can only be charged if IBAMA can prove intent, that the buyers knew that the documents claiming to show that the timber was legally felled were fraudulent. According to Márcio Astrini, from Greenpeace, the new norm creates “a kind of second-scale impunity in the commercial chain,” — intent is a very difficult legal claim to prove.A family farm that currently supplies food for public schools. A new government policy will allow states to decide which farms provide school meals, increasing the likelihood that large plantations will be favored over small farms. Image courtesy of FNDE.Reducing support for small producersThe government, while facilitating agribusiness, is also ending some of the long-standing programs that supported small family farms — important providers of staple foods to Brazilians.One key policy shift alters a long-established government program mandating that small farms be prioritized in the sale of food to municipal and state governments for the free lunch programs through which thousands of Brazilian public schools feed their pupils.Selling food to schools has been an important source of family farm income since 2009 when the Lula government decided that at least 30% of resources used by the National Fund for the Development of Education (FNDE) to fund school meals be used to purchase food directly from family farmers. The government made it clear then that it wanted to give “priority to agrarian reform settlements, indigenous communities and quilombolas,” communities made up of runaway slave descendants.Now, a bill in Congress, proposed by ultra-conservative senator Izalci Lucas (under investigation for financial fraud), would leave it to municipal and state governments to set the percentage of food purchased from family farms. Given that many of these governments are ruralist-controlled, it seems likely they would increase purchases from big, commercial farms, while cutting off small producers in agrarian reform settlements, indigenous communities and quilombolas.Indigenous people, like these Munduruku warriors, have battled for years to gain access to government to better protect land rights and the environment. Reorganization of administrative councils and other government bodies is being used to deny a voice to civil society and environmentalists, according to critics. Image by Mauricio Torres.Muting civil society voicesEven as it boosts land grabber rights and agribusiness opportunities, the Bolsonaro government is silencing civil society representatives who formerly provided a voice for those most likely to be harmed by Amazon deforestation and development. In particular, the administration has restructured government entities charged with combating deforestation and reducing Brazil’s climate change impacts.In April 2019, Bolosonaro closed down hundreds of government boards and bodies that included members of both civil society and government. In so doing, it assured that Brazil would arrive at the United Nations climate summit in December (COP25) with no delegates representing Brazilian environmental organizations — making it unlikely anyone would embarrass Bolsonaro by raising objections to Brazil’s rising deforestation rates and its abandonment of its commitment to meet its Paris Climate Agreement carbon cut pledges.At the end of November, just three days before COP25 began, the government announced five decrees recreating some of the abolished public organs. But the bodies’ composition has been changed by Environment Minister Ricardo Salles: they are smaller and without representatives of civil society, or with too few to influence public policy.One example: the Protected Areas of Amazonia Program (ARPA), considered the most ambitious program in the world for the preservation of tropical forests. The membership of its administrative council has been cut from 12 to seven members. The Environment Ministry, which used to have two members, now has none. Civil society, which once had two members, now has one, and private donors, once with three seats, now have only one.In similar fashion the government changed the composition of the Consultative Council of the National Fund for Forest Development (FNDF). Until mid-October 2019, FNDP had 14 members, three each from social movements, environmental organizations and traditional communities. Now the number of members has been reduced to seven, with all of those groups losing their members. FNDP promotes technological innovation and encourages collaborations with industry relating to forests.The government’s dismissive attitude toward international concern over Brazil’s rapidly rising deforestation rate and contribution to the climate crisis was perhaps best reflected in a Twitter post by Environment Minister Salles in Madrid as December’s COP25 was ending. “To compensate for our emissions at COP, a veggie meal,” he wrote, accompanying his words with a photo of a gigantic plate piled high with barbecued beef. Whatever else may be said, the Bolsonaro administration has made it clear who it supports, and who it doesn’t.Banner image caption: Under MP 910, illegally deforested public land, like that seen here inside the Kayapó indigenous territory in Pará state, can be legitimately claimed by the land grabber who cut down the trees, using the illegal deforestation as proof of “occupation.”FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Article published by Glenn Schererlast_img read more

In other news: Environmental stories from around the web, Jan. 10, 2020

first_imgConservation, Environment, Weekly environmental news update Article published by John Cannon There are many important conservation and environmental stories Mongabay isn’t able to cover.Here’s a digest of some of the significant developments from the week.If you think we’ve missed something, feel free to add it in the comments.Mongabay does not vet the news sources below, nor does the inclusion of a story on this list imply an endorsement of its content. Tropical forestsForest countries and food companies must build “trust,” one commentator says (Ethical Corporation).Chocolate producers see regulations as a possible solution to a long struggle with child labor in the industry (The Morning Call).New research ties deforestation to Ebola outbreaks (CIFOR Forests News).Indigenous groups in India cry foul about a rule requiring reforestation for any forest loss (Undark).Lemurs in Madagascar need a more organized reforestation effort to save them, a scientist says (The Washington Post) …… While a new paper has found that Madagascar could lose all of its forest by 2070 (UPI).Communities in the Solomon Islands are working to stave off illegal logging (National Geographic).Police investigate whether illegal logging played a role in floods in Indonesia (The Jakarta Post).Other newsAlmonds depend on pollination by bees, and it turns out it’s a deadly task (The Guardian).A gray whale joined surfers for a session in San Diego (Men’s Journal).Here are some ways to help out Australia as the country has lost more than a billion animals to wildfires (CNET) …… While its leader has drawn criticism for his handling of the crisis and his pro-fossil fuels stance (The Washington Post).The fires aside, Australia sits on the front line of climate change (The Atlantic).Global temperatures during 2019 were the second-highest on record, just behind 2016 (The New York Times).A second coyote attack on humans has occurred in Chicago (The New York Times).The great auk went from thriving to extinct in less than four centuries (Hakai Magazine).Climate change is threatening new targets: the marine labs poised at the sea’s edge (The New York Times).More acidic marine environments could hamper the U.S. economy (Scientific American).The 2004 tsunami relief efforts brought in aid to help fishing communities rebound, but now there’s evidence that the surge may be leading to damaged ecosystems (Devex).How much does that carbon offset fee on your airline ticket help? (YES Magazine).Traditions may help protect hunted birds in Lebanon (The New York Times).Banner image of a female crowned lemur (Eulemur coronatus) by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Mongabay’s 10 most popular stories for January 2020

first_imgEnvironment, most popular articles January 2020 was a record-setting traffic month for Mongabay with more than 11.2 million pageviews across Mongabay.com and Mongabay.co.id.Below are the 10 news.mongabay.com stories that racked up the most traffic during the month.This list does not include stories from our Indonesia, Latam, India, or Brazil bureaus. January 2020 was a record-setting traffic month for Mongabay with more than 11.2 million pageviews across Mongabay.com and Mongabay.co.id. Below are the ten news.mongabay.com stories that racked up the most traffic during the month.Women from the Xingu Territory unite against threats from Bolsonaro administration (12/18/19) Written by Maria Fernanda Ribeiro – 694,270 pageviews.In May 2019, some 200 representatives from 16 different ethnicities gathered for the first women’s summit in the Xingu Indigenous Territory’s in the state of Mato Grosso. Feeling under threat from policies regarding native peoples under the Jair Bolsonaro administration and tired of their community roles being restricted to domestic tasks, the women met to discuss ways to occupy leadership roles alongside men and, in doing so, gain strength to protect their territory.Even though many men in the Xingu still disapprove of female empowerment, the event itself already led to changes in local gender relationships: During the summit, some domestic partners took responsibility for household tasks and childcare while the women were away. In the village where the event was held, the men took over traditional female jobs like collecting food, fishing and cooking for the hundreds of women present.This is a particularly delicate time in the region: 147 square kilometers (57.8 square miles) of the forest were destroyed in the Xingu Socio-environmental Biodiversity Corridor between July and August 2019 — 172% more than occurred during the same period last year. A mosaic composed of 21 indigenous reserves and nine conservation units, the corridor is home to one of Earth’s largest concentrations of environmental diversity.Eu / Chinese soy consumption linked to species impacts in Brazilian Cerrado: study (12/24/19) Written by Sarah Sax – 188,390 pageviews.The Brazilian Cerrado, the world’s largest tropical savanna, is a biodiversity hotspot with thousands of unique species and is home to 5 percent of the world’s biodiversity.However, half of the Cerrado has already been converted to agriculture; much of it is now growing soy which is exported abroad, particularly to the European Union (EU) and China, primarily as animal feed. But tracing soy-driven biodiversity and species losses to specific commodities traders and importing nations is challenging.Now a new groundbreaking study published in the journal PNAS has modeled the biodiversity impacts of site-specific soy production, while also linking specific habitat losses and species losses to nations and traders.For example, the research found that the consumption of Brazilian soy by EU countries has been especially detrimental to the giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla), which has lost 85 percent of its habitat to soy in the state of Mato Grosso.Tool use in puffins may point to ‘underestimated’ intelligence in seabirds (1/8/20) Published under under Mongabay’s generic byline – 187,981 pageviews.A camera trap in Iceland captured video of an Atlantic puffin using a stick to scratch itself.The discovery, along with a similar observation in Wales in 2014, is the first evidence of tool use in seabirds.The findings suggest that seabirds like puffins may be more intelligent or possess greater problem-solving skills than once thought.Photos: Top 15 new species of 2019 (12/26/19) Written by Shreya Dasgupta – 183,796 pageviews.In 2019, Mongabay covered several announcements of new-to-science species.The “discovery” of a new-to-science species is always an awe-inspiring bit of news; the outcome of dogged perseverance, months or years of field surveys, and long periods of sifting through hundreds of museum records.In no particular order, we present our 15 top picks.Agroforestry ‘home gardens’ build community resilience in southern Ethiopia (12/5/18) Written by Tesfa-Alem Tekle – 129,426 pageviews.The village of Bule is believed to be the birthplace of traditional “home garden” agroforestry in Ethiopia.Farmers here practice this ancient multi-storied agroforestry system — the growing of trees, shrubs and annual crops together in a forest-mimicking system — around their homesteads, hence the name home garden.Trees provide fruit, timber, fodder or soil-building properties and shade for mid-story crops like coffee and enset, with vegetable and medicinal herbs growing on the forest floor.Farm families are more food secure, because the system provides economic, ecological and environmental attributes and provide year-round and marketable harvests.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worried (1/22/20) Written by Nanditha Chandraprakash – 107,268 pageviews.A plan to plant 2.42 billion trees by the Isha Foundation along the Cauvery River has attracted the chagrin of some scientists.While scientists say the project is well-meaning, they don’t believe it will cure the Cauvery River’s ills as promised.The Isha Foundation has yet to announce a number of details of the project, including what tree species will be planted.India’s rivers are suffering from numerous issues, but researchers contend mass tree planting is too simplistic to fix them all.2019: The year Sri Lanka’s stunning new species came to light (Commentary) (1/6/20) Written by Amila Prasanna Sumanapala – 106,987 pageviews.In 2019, biodiversity-rich Sri Lanka yielded up more than 50 species new to science, most of them endemic to the Indian Ocean island.Description of invertebrates scaled a new high with 32 new species discoveries recorded in a single year.The newly described species are mostly range-restricted species known from very limited localities that require immediate conservation efforts.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay.Protecting India’s fishing villages: Q&A with ‘maptivist’ Saravanan (1/10/19) Written by Mahima Jain – 97,920 pageviews.Fishing communities across the southern Indian state of Tamil Nadu are fighting to protect their traditional lands as the sea rises on one side and residential and industrial development encroaches on the others.To support these communities, a 35-year-old local fisherman is helping them create maps that document how they use their land.By creating their own maps, the communities are taking control of a tool that has always belonged to the powerful.Their maps allow them to speak the language of the state so they can resolve disputes and mount legal challenges against industries and government projects encroaching on their land and fishing grounds.Palm oil, fire pushing protected areas in Honduras to the ‘point of no return’ (12/31/19) Written by Leonardo Guevara and Lesly Frazier – 88,736 pageviews.According to the Honduran Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock (SAG), 190,000 hectares of oil palm are being cultivated in Honduras. They extend from the Cortés department to the Colón department along the country’s Atlantic coast.African oil palm has taken over 20 and 30 percent of the land in Punta Izopo National Park and Jeanette Kawas National Park, respectively.In 2016, a fire in Jeanette Kawas National Park consumed 412 hectares of land. Fire also damaged Punta Izopo National Park in August 2019.Indonesian man jailed for smuggling 7,000 ‘living fossil’ horseshoe crabs (12/3/19) Written by Ayat S. Karokaro – 83,795 pageviews.A court in Indonesia has sentenced a boat captain to 15 months in jail and fined him $3,500 for attempting to traffic thousands of dead horseshoe crabs to Thailand.All three horseshoe crabs found in Indonesian waters are protected under the country’s laws, but conservationists say the illegal trade continues largely unchecked.Horseshoe crabs have existed for nearly half a billion years, but today face rapidly declining populations across their range as a result of overfishing for use as food and bait, production of biomedical products derived from their blood, and habitat loss from coastal development and erosion. Article published by Rhett Butlercenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

WTO rules against COOL

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The Appellate Body of the World Trade Organization (WTO) issued its decision ruling against Country of Origin Labeling (COOL).“The World Trade Organization dispute panel has ruled that U.S. Country of Origin Labeling (COOL) regulations for meats are not in compliance with previous WTO decisions. That means we need further effort to craft an acceptable COOL program,” said Bob Stallman, president of the American Farm Bureau. “Farm Bureau will carefully review the decision and then determine recommended actions. We will work with Congress, USDA and USTR to reach the goal of an effective COOL program that conforms to international trade rules.”National Farmers Union (NFU) President Roger Johnson said while this is a set back for COOL, there is still ample opportunity for the administration, Mexico and Canada to negotiate an acceptable path forward.“As we have seen in other disputes, once decisions are handed down, WTO members often work together to find a solution that will work for them,” Johnson said. “In this case, such a solution must involve continuation of a meaningful country-of-origin labeling requirement.”Johnson pointed out that there have been various press reports in recent weeks indicating that the administration will work with Canada and Mexico on COOL.“We support that approach to the extent it results in a mutually agreed result that provides consumers meaningful information on the meat products they purchase, including the country where the animal was born, raised and slaughtered. With the significant interest by consumers in knowing where their food comes from, any other result is not acceptable,” he said. “While those who have opposed giving consumers more information on where their meat products are from have focused on potential retaliation, retaliation is relevant only if the parties cannot reach an agreement on how to move forward and then only after an arbitration process. And the amount of any retaliation is by definition speculative at best and aimed to raise alarm where none is warranted. Indeed, looking at the recent report from Dr. Robert Taylor at Auburn University, there is significant evidence indicating that any harm to our trading partners has in fact been negligible at most.”last_img read more