Walker backs Rooneys England comeback

first_imgKyle Walker believes Wayne Rooney’s one-off appearance for England this month is a deserved honour for himThe FA have handed Rooney a surprise call-up for England’s friendly against the United States at Wembley next Thursday.It will be Rooney’s 120th England appearance and his first in two years.The likes of former England striker Alan Shearer have accused the FA of turning the game into a “Rooney testimonial”.Jadon Sancho, Borussia DortmundCrouch: Liverpool could beat Man United to Jadon Sancho Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Peter Crouch wouldn’t be surprised to see Jadon Sancho end up at Liverpool one day instead of his long-term pursuers Manchester United.But Walker is pleased with the decision and believes it’s well deserved.“It’s good. Wayne was there from when I was 20,” said Walker in a pre-match press conference for Manchester City’s Champions League game against Shakhtar Donetsk on YouTube.“He helped me right through my England career and I think it’s the send-off he deserves for what he’s done for both English football and for England.”The DC United striker has provided a record 53 goals for England along with a further 22 assists in 119 games.last_img read more

Bones of a baby T rex now for sale on eBay

first_img pic.twitter.com/FBPPlHWQOh— KU Natural History (@kunhm) April 9, 2019 Share your voice $2.95 million could get you a baby T. rex. Dave and Les Jacobs/Blend Images/Getty Images If you’ve got an extra $2.95 million lying around (and who doesn’t?), the remains of a baby Tyrannosaurus rex could be yours. An eBay listing for a young T. rex’s 15-foot body and 21-inch skull is drawing attention because, well, when was the last time you saw a dinosaur for sale online?According to the Lawrence Journal-World, the T. rex belongs to Alan Detrich and had been on exhibit at the University of Kansas Natural History Museum. The university pulled the bones from display after the listing went up.Detrich didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment, but in a tweet from April 10 said, “Today I will remove my 68 million year old 4 year old T-Rex Fossil that has been on display at the Museum for the past two years. …….Your Welcome.”Detrich reached out to J.R. Bissell, who runs Pirate Gold Coins, to actually list the bones on eBay. Bissell describes Pirate Gold Coins as a marketplace and “quasi-online museum” for artifacts. In a statement, Bissell said:”Whether or not you agree with the private sale of artifacts such as the baby T-Rex, the simple fact is this — many archaeological explorations require private funding. The individuals or groups that have the capital necessary to provide funding for archaeological exploration cannot sustain their efforts if they do not receive a return on their capital.  As such, a private market that allows investors to recoup costs and derive profit in exchange for the high degree of risk that is required to fund archaeological exploration is absolutely necessary.”On Twitter, the museum sought to clarify that it was not involved in the sale, saying “the specimen on exhibit-loan to us has been removed from exhibit and is being returned to the owner. We have asked that the owner remove any association with us from his sale.” Culture Tagscenter_img So far, no one has made an offer on the bones, although about 774 folks are watching the auction as of this writing. eBay didn’t respond to a request for comment. Detrich told the newspaper he and his brother discovered the bones in Montana in 2013. According to his Twitter account, this isn’t his first T. rex sale. Detrich tweeted that he sold another one he dubbed Samson for “millions of dollars.” In a letter dated April 12, the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology expressed ethical concerns about the sale. “Because vertebrate fossils are rare, most of them contribute uniquely to our knowledge of the history of life. Each one that is lost from the public trust, is part of that already fragmentary history that we will never collectively recover,” the letter said. Originally published April 17, 8:14 a.m. PT.Update, May 2: Adds comment from Pirate Gold Coins. 0 Post a commentlast_img read more

Over 100 die in Malaysian immigration camps in 2 yrs

first_img.More than one hundred foreigners died in the past two years in Malaysia’s immigration detention centers from various diseases and unknown causes, according to documents from the government-funded National Human Rights Commission reviewed by Reuters.The toll, which has not been previously disclosed, is based on Malaysian immigration department data provided to the commission, which is known by its Malay acronym Suhakam. There were 83 deaths in 2015, and at least 35 in 2016 up to 20 December.It is unclear whether the death rate is higher than in neighboring countries. Government officials in Indonesia and Thailand told Reuters they do not disclose such numbers. The rate is higher than in major industrialized nations such as the United States, which in the last financial year recorded 10 deaths in its immigration detention system, which has many more detainees than Malaysia’s.More than half of the 118 dead are from Myanmar, the source for tens of thousands of refugees coming to Malaysia, including Rohingya Muslims escaping persecution by Myanmar’s authorities and its majority Buddhist population. The number of Rohingya fatalities in the camps is unknown.For a graphic on deaths in detention in Malaysia, click hereMalaysian prime minister Najib Razak has been a harsh critic of the Myanmar government and its de-facto leader Aung San Suu Kyi after a crackdown in October by Myanmar’s security forces led many Rohingya to flee across its borders amid multiple allegations of mass killings and gang rapes by troops. He has called for foreign intervention to stop the “genocide” in Myanmar.Najib’s office did not return calls seeking comment.“The numbers are too many and are shocking and it calls for the overhaul of the system,” said Jerald Joseph, one of eight commissioners at Suhakam, which was established by the Malaysian parliament through an act in 1999 and is due to publicly announce the numbers next week in its annual report on human rights issues in Malaysia.He described conditions at the centers, some of which he has visited, as “appalling” and said the deaths should be investigated as a criminal matter.  The illnesses that led to some of the deaths may have been caused or exacerbated by poor sanitation and food, physical abuse and a lack of medical attention, said Joseph, who was speaking on behalf of the commission.BRUTAL CONDITIONSMalaysia’s home ministry, which oversees the immigration department, said it was trying to improve the conditions in the centers but that its budget was constrained.“I agree there is some overcrowding and the conditions are not ideal. We are always trying to improve the procedures, health conditions and management of these sites. The problem is we hit a budget brick wall,” said deputy home minister Nur Jazlan Mohamed in an interview.He said there wasn’t enough funding to upgrade facilities, provide adequate healthcare and hire and train enforcement officers. Jazlan blamed overcrowding on the “never ending flow of people seeking better future in Malaysia.”The living conditions inside the Malaysian camps are grim – overcrowded, unhygienic and brutal – according to interviews with 13 former detainees, and 12 others who have regularly visited the centers, including people from government agencies and rights groups.Those who had been detained say they did not get adequate food, water or healthcare, that many inmates developed skin and lung infections, and the sick are usually not isolated, leading to the spread of contagious diseases.All of the detainees interviewed also allege they were beaten by guards at the camps or witnessed others being beaten. One former Rohingya inmate of the Lenggeng camp in the southwestern state of Negeri Sembilan told Reuters in an interview that he witnessed detainees being beaten and then saw them die when the resulting injuries were not treated. “When we asked for medicines, we were beaten,” he said.Reuters could not independently verify his account or the similar accusations made by other detainees. They all declined to be identified for fear of reprisals.Asked about the claims of beatings, Jazlan said he needs more evidence to establish if it was prevalent.  “I hope critics won’t rely on detainees’ testimony, and come up with proper evidence,” he said.FARED WORSEOf the 118 people recorded as dying in 2015-2016, 63 were from Myanmar, and people from that country have fared worse than those from elsewhere, the documents from Suhakam and data from the Malaysian government’s Enforcement Agency Integrity Commission (EAIC) show.During 2016, for example, there were 14,180 Myanmar nationals detained and at least 14 of them died, while there were only five fatalities among 34,586 Indonesian inmates. The documents and data don’t explain this discrepancy and Reuters was unable to independently confirm the reason for it.People from Myanmar, including Rohingya Muslims, tend to stay in the detention centers longer as they try to persuade the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) to issue them with identification cards that allow them to stay in Malaysia temporarily, rights groups and former detainees said. People from other countries are often undocumented migrant workers who are deported home relatively quickly.Malaysia, which has not signed the UN Refugee Convention, treats refugees as illegal migrants with few rights.Asked about the deaths of Myanmar nationals in Malaysian detention centers, Zaw Htay, who is spokesman for Myamnar’s Suu Kyi, said that “we haven’t heard about these cases.” He also said that “a lot of Bengali people in Malaysia say they come from Myanmar to get UNHCR cards.”“Bengali” is a derogatory term used by many in Myanmar to refer to the Rohingya that suggests they come from Bangladesh, even though many Rohingya have lived in the country for generations.LUNG INFECTIONSThe documents reviewed by Reuters give causes of death for 68 detainees. Pneumonia and lung infections led to 19 deaths, at least 10 were the result of various heart-related conditions, and five died from the bacterial disease leptospirosis, which is often spread through the urine of infected animals, including rodents.Sepsis, or septic shock, a condition usually triggered by other illnesses, claimed 21 victims, including some who were suffering from pneumonia or leptospirosis, various forms of tuberculosis led to three deaths, and one Filipino woman committed suicide.The 13 detention centers in Malaysia held a total 86,795 detainees for various periods during 2016, according to the EAIC.Malaysia isn’t the only country in southeast Asia that has faced criticism for the conditions in its prisons.In its human rights report for 2016, the US State Department said Indonesian and Thai facilities, including those used to detain immigrants, are overcrowded. It said government figures showed that 548 prisoners died “in custody” in Indonesia between January and June of 2016, and 762 died in “official custody” in Thailand in the year to September 2016. However, there was no breakdown between those who died in ordinary jails and those who died in other forms of incarceration, such as immigration detention facilities.No cause was given for 50 deaths in Malaysia. They are classified in the documents as “no report” or “pending autopsy” or “undetermined” or “awaiting report from hospital” or “unascertained.” One center in Kuala Lumpur had 13 deaths in 2016, but no reasons were stated for any of them.When asked about the lack of reasons given for so many deaths, Jazlan said he will look into it.The documents do not specify the reasons for the lower death rate in 2016, though a Reuters analysis of them and related data shows that there was a 27 percent drop in the number of people detained at the end of 2016 from a year earlier.last_img read more

Dont Put Your Profits at Risk by Ignoring This Crucial Protection for

first_imgNovember 30, 2017 Money talks. And it’s telling small-business owners they risk losing it if they don’t protect themselves against looming cyber threats.A recent report published by the Better Business Bureau (BBB) states half of small businesses couldn’t stay profitable more than 30 days if they lost critical data.Related: Here’s How Taking Cybersecurity Very Seriously Enhances Your BrandThe BBB reports out of the 1,100 businesses they surveyed in North America, less than half provide cybersecurity education to their employees. That’s troubling considering how many cyber attacks occur due to an unsuspecting employee clicking on a hyperlink in a fake email. Ninety-one percent of hacks on businesses start with a spear phishing email scam, according to KnowBe4, a company specializing in security awareness training for employees.Despite the prevalence of anti-malware software, firewalls and other cyber products installed at most small businesses, employees remain the weak spot and most likely point-of-entry for hackers.The BBB says employee education is the most cost-effective cybersecurity prevention tool. KnowBe4’s training, for example, costs only $16 to $28.50 per user, per year, depending on the option. If the low cost to train employees on security isn’t enough to convince companies to do so, then perhaps contemplating the costs of not training their people will be.Related: How Vulnerable Are You to Cybercrime? (Infographic)Ransomware attacksWhen an unaware employee clicks in a spear phishing email, it often injects a ransomware infection onto a computer or mobile device. Ransomware restricts access to files, often threatening permanent data destruction unless a ransom is paid.When a company pays a ransom, there’s no assurance it’ll reclaim its data. Plus, paying a ransom invites more attacks.Ransomware damages are predicted to cost the world $5 billion in 2017, and climb to $11.5 billion in 2019, according to my firm, Cybersecurity Ventures. In 2015, the costs were a mere $325 million.With more than 50 percent of all cyber attacks committed against small businesses, the ransomware costs — and resulting losses — are mounting on defenseless entrepreneurs.Related: 5 Things You Need to Know About the New (and Scary) Wave of ‘File-less’ Cyber AttacksData backupSmall businesses are notorious for poor data backup practices.The No More Ransom Project offers ransomware self-help to small-business owners globally. It’s an initiative led by the National High Tech Crime Unit of the Netherlands’ police and Europol’s European Cybercrime Centre to help victims of ransomware retrieve their encrypted data without having to pay the criminals.The Project’s free prevention advice puts data backup at the top of its list. The best way to thwart a ransom demand is to have all data backed up. Then there’s nothing to pay a ransom for.Also on the list, beware of suspicious emails — which reinforces the BBB’s recommendation to train employees on how to spot them.To sum up, an ounce of cyber prevention is worth a pound of cure. Small businesses don’t have to lose money to cyber attacks.Related Video: A Genius Former Hacker Explains How to Keep Your Business Safe From Cyber Attacks Hear from business owners and CEOs who went through a crippling business problem and came out the other side bigger and stronger. Listen Now 3 min read Problem Solvers with Jason Feifer Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.last_img read more