10 months ago​Blackpool target Newcastle whizkid Sorensen

first_img​Blackpool target Newcastle whizkid Sorensenby Ansser Sadiq10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveBlackpool are chasing after Newcastle United youngster Elias Sorensen.The Danish under-21 international could go out on loan for the rest of the season.The 19-year-old has penned a new contract with the Magpies, but his first team opportunities are limited for this term.Chronicle Live suggests that a loan to Blackpool would help them boost their chances of making the playoffs.When asked about a loan for Sorensen, Newcastle coach Ben Dawson is quoted by Chronicle Live as saying: “It has to be the right place to go on loan – you saw tonight some of the strengths he has and some of the areas where he has to develop.”He needs to play every week and the best place for him to go on loan is somewhere where there’s an experienced striker for him to learn from.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorAnsser SadiqShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Utah Fan Tries To Make Fun Of Cal’s Academics, Makes Grammatical Error

first_imgUtah fan makes fun of Cal saying "if Marshawn Lynch can get into Cal than anyone can".marshawn lynch cal utah fan spelling errorESPN’s College GameDay is at Utah this week, and Utes fans have come up with some pretty clever signs ahead of their big Pac-12 contest against Cal Saturday night. The one you’ll see below is not one of them.A Utah fan, attempting to make fun of Cal’s academics and question former running back Marshawn Lynch’s intelligence, made a grammatical error. Check it out:SIGN RULE NO. 1: If you’re going to make fun of the other school’s academics, check your grammar. pic.twitter.com/sz8SBEVqOx— College GameDay (@CollegeGameDay) October 10, 2015Marshawn knows the difference between “than” and “then” #gameday pic.twitter.com/qhDoZMinx6— GoldenBlogs (@GoldenBlogs) October 10, 2015For the record, Cal is also one of the best public schools in the country. Major fail all around here.last_img read more

Yukon to apply ice BandAid to cross river reach stranded residents minister

first_imgDAWSON CITY, Yn – The Yukon government plans to apply an “ice Band-Aid” to the Yukon River outside Dawson City after the channel failed to freeze sufficiently for the second year in a row, leaving hundreds of residents stranded over the winter.Highways Minister Richard Mostyn said work on an ice bridge to the community of West Dawson will begin January and should take about three weeks to complete.“This has never been tried before in the territory. It’s a situation that I’d prefer not to have to do, but we’ve got conditions in the Klondike these days that are abnormal,” he said.“Last year, the river didn’t freeze. This year, it’s not looking like it’s going to freeze again. So we’re going to take some action.”The Yukon River usually freezes over within a few weeks after the summer ferry stops operating, allowing crossings to be made initially on foot, by snowmobile and eventually in a vehicle.Public works crews usually flood, smooth and widen the route after a few more weeks to create an ice highway.Mostyn had promised West Dawson residents after the river failed to freeze last year that the government would take action if the same thing happened this year.An ice bridge would reconnect about 200 people to the main part of town.An alternate crossing point does exist, but accessing it involves a 10 to 15 kilometre journey south of town on foot, by dog team, on skis or with a snowmobile.Mostyn said the typical recipe for building an ice bridge is to spray ice water over a river to encourage it to freeze.He said he is unsure if the equipment is available for the spraying technique, but the government is also considering other methods, which he described as old fashioned and less efficient.The “manufactured ice formation” project will cost about $100,000 to build and maintain, plus an extra $100,000 for one-time engineering costs, Mostyn said.He said he and his team are “fairly confident” the bridge can be built, though there are no guarantees.“The climate is not what it once was, and so we’re going to have to be innovative,” Mostyn said. “This is one of the projects we’re going to start with.”The strategy is a way of helping the Mother Nature, which he described as a “fickle mistress.”Wayne Potoroka, the mayor of Dawson city, said he was glad to hear news of what he called an “almost surreal” plan.“I think it’s worth a shot,” he added, saying that Yukon is feeling the effects of climate change. “This is what adaptation looks like.”Mostyn ruled out the possibility of a permanent bridge being built in the near future to West Dawson.(Whitehorse Star)last_img read more

Greenpeace in standoff over Greenland Arctic drilling

first_imgAPTN National NewsGreenpeace says two of its ships tracking an oil rig on the Greenland side of Baffin Bay are being warned off by the Danish Navy.The environmental group wants to stop all drilling in the Arctic.And for once, Greenpeace and Nunavut are, for at least for the time being, on the same side.APTN National News reporter Kent Driscoll has this story from Iqaluit.last_img

Smoking and drinking during pregnancy – stigma drives women to secrecy

first_imgFurther Reading Source:https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1871519218306085 By Dr. Ananya Mandal, MDFeb 12 2019A new study has found that because of the stigma around smoking and drinking during pregnancy, many women are doing these in private.Researchers from the University of Cardiff have noted that pregnant women are “irritated and alienated” by the perceived notions regarding the harmful effects of smoking and drinking during pregnancy. Recent figures have shown that one in five women from Wales smoke during their first pregnancy.This new study published in the journal Women and Birth reveals that women feel they receive health advice in a “judgemental tone” from their antenatal healthcare providers and midwives that make them reluctant to open up for advice and support during pregnancy regarding smoking and drinking. Some of the pregnant also reported feeling judged by their non-smoking partners. A significant number of women who were smokers or non-smokers agreed that smoking during pregnancy is acceptable if in private. They however condoned smoking in public. They felt that pregnant women who smoke in public receive a lot of negative judgement and criticism from those around them. E-cigarette smokers too felt judged, the study found.For this study the team of researchers interviewed 10 low income pregnant women belonging to deprived areas of south Wales. They were provided visual questionnaires and clues like timelines, collages and thought bubbles related activities. Image Credit: Napocska / Shutterstock Dr Aimee Grant, from Cardiff University’s Centre for Trials Research, in a statement said, “Moral judgements are commonly directed towards mothers through reference to health behaviour in pregnancy, and working-class mothers are particularly subject to this criticism, ignoring the challenges of living on a low income. Our study shows that these looks and comments – including by members of the public – irritate and alienate pregnant women, making them less likely to seek help. No one wants to be judged and shamed.” The authors of this study called for more “empathy” than judgement.The health advocates worldwide advice pregnant women to abstain from alcohol and smoking tobacco. There are over 4,000 chemicals present in cigarette smoke that can harm the unborn baby and also reduce the oxygen supply. The Chief Medical Officers for the UK makes similar recommendations for pregnant women. The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG) also added that there are no safe alcohol consumption limits during pregnancy.Dr Dunla Gallagher, one of the co-authors of the study says that smoking could be a “coping strategy” for some of the low-income, pregnant mothers. She said in a statement, “Rather than stigma, women need empathy and a recognition of the challenges that pregnancy can bring in terms of women’s independent choices.” Smoking and Pregnancy Effects of Passive Smoking on Children’s Health Carcinogens in Cigarette Smoke Everything You Need to Know About Giving Up Cigaretteslast_img read more

Study finds substantial volume overload in kidney failure patients initiating peritoneal dialysis

first_imgWe intended to associate practices of peritoneal dialysis use of hypertonic exchanges, use of automated peritoneal dialysis vs. continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis, use of icodextrin, and use of diuretics with technique failure. Our main finding is that the association between technique failure and fluid overload is dependent upon center size and thus presumably experience within the treating center.”Wim Van Biesen, MD, PhD, University Hospital Ghent, Belgium Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)May 24 2019A new study published in CJASN found substantial volume overload, or too much fluid in the body, in patients with kidney failure who initiated peritoneal dialysis. Volume overload tended to improve over time after starting dialysis, but was at all times was higher in males vs. females and in patients with diabetes vs. those without. The study also revealed variations in practice of care across different geographic regions. This variation was associated with differences in degree of volume overload.Individuals with kidney failure who are undergoing hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis often experience fluid overload. To examine the implications of this condition, Wim Van Biesen, MD, PhD (University Hospital Ghent, in Belgium) and his colleagues designed a study to assess patients’ health and fluid volume over time after initiating peritoneal dialysis. It’s thought that actively managing volume overload may reduce the risk of technique failure (transfer from peritoneal dialysis to hemodialysis) and prolong patient survival.In the study of 1,054 patients from 28 countries who were examined every 3 months, volume overload before the start of dialysis amounted to an average of 1.9 L and decreased to 1.2 L during the first year. After 3 years of follow-up, the average relative volume overload in patients was lower than at the start in participants from all regions except those of Latin American, where it increased. The investigators concluded that volume overload is already present before the start of dialysis, and it tends to improve over the first 6 months and stabilize afterwards.At all time points, males and participants with diabetes were at a higher risk of experiencing volume overload. Also, volume overload was associated with a higher risk of premature death. The study revealed different treatment practices to address volume overload across dialysis centers and regions. Related StoriesResearchers identify trends in use of transcatheter dialysis conduit procedures over 15 yearsRapid fluid removal from patients with failing kidneys linked to increased risk of deathOne-fifth of U.S. surgeons still ‘overusing’ riskier method to create kidney dialysis access, study findsIn an accompanying Patient Voice editorial, Shari Gilford shared her experience of peritoneal dialysis, both ambulatory and automated, for 7 years. She also questioned why patients in Latin America had a different outcome than those from other regions.”If there are factors other than dialysate type, dialysate concentrate, or diet which make it more difficult for patients to control their volume overload, patients need to be made aware of this,” she wrote. “Based on my own experience [in hot vs. cold seasons], I wonder if the year-round hotter climate of Latin America, as opposed to most other regions in the study which have cold seasons, could have been a factor for fluid overload leading to increased mortality. Continued study of this variable might improve outcomes for peritoneal dialysis patients who live in warmer climes.”Source:American Society of NephrologyJournal reference:Biesen, W.V. et al. (2019) Evolution Over Time of Volume Status and PD-Related Practice Patterns in an Incident Peritoneal Dialysis Cohort. Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. doi.org/10.2215/CJN.11590918.last_img read more

Five easy health tips for men

first_imgFollow five easy tips for a healthier you:1. See your doctor.It happens to everyone. Some health challenges come on with age. Family history plays a big part in what a physician will focus on, but there are key issues and screenings that are age-related. “Seeing your doctor regularly means that you have a baseline for important screenings,” says Heckman. “This includes everything from cholesterol to cancer screenings and osteoporosis.”Related StoriesMore than 936 million people have sleep apnea, ResMed-led analysis revealsDiet and nutrition influence microbiome in colonic mucosaUnpleasant experiences could be countered with a good night’s REM sleep2. Eat a healthy diet.You’ve heard this before. A diet that’s low in fat and full of fruits and vegetables can help lower the risk of certain cancers, such as prostate cancer. “For good prostate health, eat your fruits and veggies,” says Aria Olumi, MD, Chief of Urologic Surgery at BIDMC.3. Quit smoking.Smoking and bladder cancer? Yes. We know that smoking is harmful to your heart and lungs-;but it’s also linked to about half of all bladder cancer cases. “Bladder cancer risk factors like age, gender, race and family history can’t be controlled,” Olumi says. “But quitting smoking can definitely lower your risk.”4. Get enough sleep.A good night’s rest can do wonders. Overstimulation of the brain, stress and a lack of sleep can cause overall fatigue and libido issues. “Lower testosterone levels may contribute to these issues, but more often than not, it’s because the patient isn’t getting enough sleep,” Olumi says. “At least seven hours of sleep a night will help your mind and body reset.”5. Take care of your mental health.Did you know mental and physical health are connected? Mental illness affects both men and women, but men may be less likely to talk about their feelings and seek help. “Mental health symptoms often appear to be physical issues-;like a racing heart, tightening chest, ongoing headaches or digestive issues,” Heckman says. “Talking to a professional or a loved one about stress or other challenges can be very helpful.” Source:Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jun 18 2019According to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, men are far more likely to skip routine health screens than women. It’s common for men to avoid going to the doctor until there’s a serious health concern. Staying healthy may just be a matter of changing habits.”Primary care physician James Heckman, MD, Assistant Medical Director of Healthcare Associates at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC)last_img read more

Study identifies key characteristics and experiences of people who internalize weight bias

first_imgWe don’t yet know why some people who struggle with their weight internalize society’s stigma and others do not. These findings represent a first step toward helping us identify, among people trying to manage their weight, who may be most likely to self-stigmatize. People who are trying to lose weight may be among the most vulnerable to weight self-stigma, but this issue is rarely discussed in treatment settings.”Study’s lead author Rebecca Pearl, PhD, an assistant professor of Psychology in Psychiatry in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jul 15 2019Weight bias is a common form of prejudice against people who are viewed as having excess weight. Some individuals who struggle with weight may internalize the stigma directed toward them, blaming and devaluing themselves because of their weight. While it’s known that weight “self-stigma” is associated with poor mental and physical health, it isn’t clear who is most prone to this internalization.In a new study published today in Obesity Science and Practice, researchers at Penn Medicine and the University of Connecticut Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity surveyed more than 18,000 adults enrolled in the commercial weight management program WW International (formerly Weight Watchers Inc.), and found that participants who internalized weight bias the most tended to be younger, female, have a higher body mass index (BMI), and have an earlier onset of their weight struggle. Participants who were black or had a romantic partner had lower levels of internalization. Research has found that, beyond the effects of BMI and depression, self-directed weight stigma is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular and metabolic disease. In this study–the largest investigation of weight self-stigma in the world–researchers surveyed adults to identify key characteristics and experiences of people who internalize weight bias.Participants recalled when in their life they experienced weight stigma from other people, how frequent and how upsetting the experiences were, and who it was that called them names, rejected them, or denied them an opportunity simply because of their weight. Results showed that almost two-thirds of the participants reported experiencing weight stigma at least once in their life, and almost half reported experiencing these events when they were children or teens. The researchers examined the relationships between these experiences and levels of self-directed stigma.Related StoriesResearch team receives federal grant to study obesity in children with spina bifidaMetabolic enzyme tied to obesity and fatty liver disease’Traffic light’ food labels associated with reduction in calories purchased by hospital employeesParticipants who reported experiencing weight stigma from others had higher levels of internalized weight bias than those who reported no experiences of weight stigma. Researchers say this was particularly true for participants who had weight-stigmatizing experiences early in life and continued to have these upsetting experiences as adults. People who experienced weight stigma from family members or friends, or from those in their workplace, community, or health care setting, also had greater evidence of weight self-stigma compared to participants who did not encounter weight stigma from those sources.”Our findings can inform ways to support people who are experiencing or internalizing weight stigma, including opportunities to address weight stigma as part of weight management and healthy lifestyle programs,” said the study’s principal investigator Rebecca Puhl, PhD, a professor of Human Development and Family Sciences at the University of Connecticut.The study sample, although the largest to date, represented only a small percentage of WW members, so the findings may not generalize to all members or to adults trying to lose weight in other ways. Some prior research has suggested that people who internalize weight bias may have worse long-term weight loss outcomes, but more research on this topic is needed.In addition, Pearl’s team is developing a psychological intervention for weight self-stigma that can be incorporated into weight management. Source:University of Pennsylvania School of Medicinelast_img read more

Poll Younger Americans less apt to use unique passwords

Poll: For many online Americans, Facebook is a habit Explore further This June 19, 2017, file photo shows fingers on laptop keyboard in North Andover, Mass. Americans appear to be heeding expert advice for keeping their passwords and accounts safe. A new poll by The Associated Press and the NORC Center for Public Affairs Research finds that 41 percent of Americans use unique passwords for most or all online services. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola, File) Start with the now-familiar advice to avoid reusing the same password across important accounts such as email, banking and social media. A new poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research finds that 41 percent of Americans say they use unique passwords for most or all online services. Just a third of adults under age 45 do so, however, compared to about half their elders.Anyone who reuses a password increases their chances of falling victim to data theft—a serious risk given such major breaches as the hacks that compromised three billion Yahoo accounts in 2013. Hackers often test big batches of passwords stolen in one breach against other potentially sensitive accounts, a practice called “credential stuffing.”Older Americans are also more likely to commit their passwords to paper, the poll found. Fifty-six percent of people aged 60 and older do so, compared to 20 percent of the under-30 crowd. If kept away from prying eyes, written passwords are generally considered a good idea.”I don’t use the same password for any two sites,” said Stephanie Harris, a 61-year-old retired warehouse manager in Sacramento, California. She shops and banks on the internet and chooses her passwords from “things I like to do, things I like to eat. Never anybody’s name because I’m not into that. If I see something really cool, then I’ll make it a password.”Harris said she changes her passwords often and uses from eight to 12 characters, sometimes including numbers and symbols.The AP-NORC poll found 32 percent of 1,047 respondents use a single password most of the time. That was a bit less than the 39 percent who told the Pew Research Center last year that most of their passwords were the same or similar.Inadequate attention to password security has helped fuel an epidemic of cybercrime. A Verizon report published last year on hacking-related data breaches said 81 percent involved weak, reused or stolen credentials—up from 63 percent the previous year.It doesn’t help that the experts themselves haven’t been consistent with their advice.The National Institute of Standards and Technology revised its best password practices last year. The new guidelines run counter to the information-security gospel that persists in much of the corporate world—namely, that that passwords should change frequently and must contain both uppercase and lowercase letters with required symbols and numbers.NIST said such requirements often yield less secure passwords. The author of the original recommendations now regrets them.Password managers—programs that can store your passwords securely, generate new random passwords and often even fill them in on login pages—are also gradually becoming more popular. Thirteen percent of respondents to the AP-NORC poll said they use them.Mike Rodriguez of Port St. Lucie, Florida, is not one of them.”I don’t trust them,” said the 50-year-old maintenance engineer, who says he only has four online accounts he uses regularly, including Facebook and banking. Rodriguez said he never saves credit card or other financial information to any online business.Rodriguez was one of 18 percent of respondents who said they use unique passwords for all their online accounts. He uses a simple method for creating them, which he didn’t appear to mind sharing with a reporter.Suffice to say it involves demographic details of various people he’s known.—-The AP-NORC poll was conducted April 11-16 using a sample drawn from NORC’s probability-based AmeriSpeak Panel, which is designed to be representative of the U.S. population. The margin of sampling error for all respondents is plus or minus 4 percentage points The number of online accounts compromised by hackers is now in the trillions—enough, perhaps, to make even technophobes think hard about the security of their passwords. Indeed, many are—especially older Americans, a new survey shows. © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Poll: Younger Americans less apt to use unique passwords (2018, April 25) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-04-poll-younger-americans-apt-unique.html More information: AP-NORC Center: www.apnorc.org/ read more