Critiques of carbon credits aren’t asking the right question (commentary)

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Carbon Credits, Carbon Emissions, Climate Change, Climate Change And Forests, Commentary, Editorials, Environment, Forest Carbon, Forests, Global Warming, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Researcher Perspective Series Rather than dwelling too much on the conclusions that critiques of carbon credit schemes seem to put forward with such conviction, we should step back and consider, “Are they asking the right question to begin with?”Ultimately, these critiques are premised on the question of whether carbon credits have, to date, delivered all the benefits they’ve promised. Their answer: A decisive “no.” The problem is that such a question, and the response, will leave many readers with the impression that carbon credits are simply a bad option, and we’ll have to look elsewhere for solutions to climate change. Unfortunately, we no longer have such a luxury.So, instead, let’s ask this: “Is there any way to achieve the goals of the Paris Agreement without protecting the world’s forests?” The answer here is another resounding “no,” but this one with much more serious implications.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. fFor those of us who have worked in the world of carbon credits for many years, the criticisms raised in articles like “An (Even More) Inconvenient Truth,” published by ProPublica last month, are nothing new. The idea of allowing polluters to offset their emissions, including by paying to protect or restore forests, has been around for decades, and we’ve heard it all before.Rather than dwelling too much on the conclusions these critiques seem to put forward with such conviction, we should step back and consider, “Are they asking the right question to begin with?”Ultimately, these critiques are premised on the question of whether carbon credits have, to date, delivered all the benefits they’ve promised. Their answer: A decisive “no.” While the recent ProPublica article is not without fault, there is no doubt that many carbon offset programs have failed to live up to expectations over the years, including some profiled in that story.The problem is that such a question, and the response, will leave many readers with the impression that carbon credits are simply a bad option, and we’ll have to look elsewhere for solutions to climate change. Unfortunately, we no longer have such a luxury. We are not in a position to pick and choose our responses to the climate emergency as we would items on a menu. The fact is, we need every solution on the table.So, instead, let’s ask this: “Is there any way to achieve the goals of the Paris Agreement without protecting the world’s forests?” The answer here is another resounding “no,” but this one with much more serious implications. The fact is emission reductions alone — however significant — will not be able to limit global warming to 1.5 or even 2 degrees above that of the pre-industrial age. We must also invest in nature. And to do that, carbon credits have a central role to play.By framing the discussion this way, rather than bemoaning past failures, we quickly come to understand just how important it is to learn from these missteps and move forward.The good news is this is already happening, and the diagnosis on carbon credits is not nearly as dire as the ProPublica article suggests. When designed and implemented well, they are an extremely effective response to climate change.The main problem is that ProPublica’s reporter, and many others, still look at the UN’s program for reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation, known as REDD+, solely as a project-level effort. It’s certainly true that the first generation of initiatives to prevent deforestation were implemented on a project-by-project basis. And, as you would expect, the quality and impact of isolated projects has varied greatly, many succumbing to the failings elaborated in the article. Unfortunately, this legacy of isolated projects has stuck with REDD+ and is perpetuated through articles like ProPublica’s.In reality, though, we’ve come a long way in our understanding since then. In fact, over seven years of negotiations, the United Nations developed a framework to incentivize and implement activities to reduce deforestation. By 2015, it was already clear that the project-level response was not sufficient, and, to be effective, efforts needed to be led at the sub-national or national level. Indeed, this is how REDD+ was written into the Paris Agreement.To give just one example: the Bujang Raba Community PES Project, coordinated by KKI Warsi in Jambi, Indonesia. Facilitated by the Indonesian REDD+ Management Agency, the project conserves 5,339 hectares (about 13,193 acres) of endangered primary rainforest in Sumatera’s Bukit Barisan forest. It involves five indigenous communities. The site is managed by the communities under a “hutan desa” (village forest) program that recognizes and secures land tenure and allows community members to sustainably manage the forest. By engaging local communities, the project reduces forest fires, illegal poaching, and unsustainable harvesting of forest products.According to Planvivo, which established the carbon standard used by the project, the project produces a 40,000-tons-of-CO2-per-year carbon benefit, and conserves the home of threatened species such as the Malayan Tapir (Tapirus indicus), Sun Bear (Helarctos malayanus), and the critically-endangered Sumatran Tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae). It also diversifies income for participating communities by introducing high-value crops such as cardamom, cocoa, and other non-timber products. Bamboo and rattan processing facilities will also open other income streams for the communities. And this is just one example.In short, it’s far too early to call time of death on carbon credits. It’s encouraging to see momentum growing among countries, sub-national actors, and the private sector to ratchet up efforts to the scale needed. But there’s a lot of work still to be done. At the country level, more can be done to include natural climate solutions in national climate targets, which would help drive demand for finance. And, similarly, at the international level, more can be done to use the flexibility allowed by the Paris Agreement for countries to develop natural climate solutions partnerships to increase emission reductions. The upcoming Climate Summit hosted by the UN Secretary-General this September offers a wonderful opportunity to make progress on these fronts.No one says this is going to be easy, but let’s start by asking the right questions. And then let’s work together to move forward.A juvenile sun bear at the Bornean Sun Bear Conservation Centre, Malaysia. The Bujang Raba Community PES Project in Jambi, Indonesia conserves crucial habitat for the bears. Photo Credit: Siew Te Wong, Thye Lim Tee, and Lin May Chiew, BSBCC.Agus Sari is CEO of Landscape Indonesia. He was Deputy Minister / Deputy Chair of the Indonesian REDD+ Management Agency. He was Co-Chair of the Working Group and Negotiating Contact Group on REDD+ Financing leading up to and at the 2013 UNFCCC COP19.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Article published by Mike Gaworeckilast_img read more

Travelogue: Visiting an indigenous rainforest tribe in Borneo (Insider)

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Rhett Butler Mongabay founder Rhett A. Butler writes about his visit to Sungai Utik, a Penan Iban community in Indonesian Borneo last month.Rhett visited Sungai Utik to see how the community has protected their customary forest from logging and deforestation.Sungai Utik was recognized for their efforts with the prestigious U.N. Equator Prize last month.This post is insider content, which is available to paying subscribers. In 2007, the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) launched the Heart of Borneo, an initiative that aimed to conserve 22 million hectares (54 million acres) in the transboundary area of Brunei, Indonesia and Malaysia. The agreement was signed between the three countries in February of that year. “HOB” conferences have been held on a… This content is for Monthly, Annual and Lifetime members only.Membership offers a way for readers to directly support Mongabay’s non-profit conservation news reporting, while getting a first-hand, behind-the-scenes look at what it takes to produce these stories. Every few weeks, we’ll publish a new member article that tells the story behind the reporting: the trials and tribulations of field reporting, personal travel accounts, photo essays, and more.You can sign up for membership Here If you’re already a member: Log InMembers getExclusive, behind-the-scenes articles.Access to our members-only newsletter.Access to periodic conversations with Mongabay journalists.center_img Archive, Conservation, Conservation Drones, Environment, Featured, Forests, Green, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Indigenous Cultures, Indigenous Peoples, Insider, Land Rights, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforest People, Rainforests, Tropical Forests last_img read more

‘Science prevails’ as suspension of award for herbicide research is reversed

first_imgArticle published by dilrukshi Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Banner image of a rice field in Sri Lanka by Upali Kohomban via Wikipedia Activism, Agriculture, Agrochemicals, Environment, Research The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) has formally named Sri Lankan scientists Channa Jayasumana and Sarath Gunatilake the recipients of its 2019 Award for Scientific Freedom and Responsibility.The pair had been named the recipients in February for their work linking glyphosate, the main chemical in the weed killer Roundup, to chronic kidney disease, but the decision was suspended before the award ceremony over concerns raised by other scientists.Jayasumana said at the time he suspected there had been pressure from the agrochemical lobby to undermine their research.He told Mongabay that the lengthy peer review ordered by the AAAS following the suspension had vindicated his and Gunatilake’s work and showed that “science has prevailed.” COLOMBO — Science prevailing over politics: That’s how a researcher who was snubbed for a high-profile award earlier this year has characterized the decision to finally recognize his achievements in highlighting a deadly public health problem in rural Sri Lanka.Channa Jayasumana and Sarath Gunatilake were to have been conferred the 2019 Award for Scientific Freedom and Responsibility from the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in February. But two days after it announced them as the award recipients, the AAAS suspended its decision, citing concerns raised by other scientists about the pair’s work linking the use of a popular weed killer to chronic kidney disease.At the time, the AAAS said it would address those concerns through a peer review and subsequently evaluate the award status.That lengthy process has now concluded, Jayasumana told Mongabay on Nov. 15, and has vindicated him and Gunatilake, who are now formally listed on the AAAS website as the recipients of the 2019 award.Jayasumana said the AAAS had written to him informing him of the review committee’s findings and “considered us suitable to be justly recognized.” He and Gunatilake have long made the case that the chemical glyphosate, best known as the main ingredient in the widely used herbicide Roundup, plays a key role in transporting heavy metals to the kidneys of those drinking contaminated water, leading to high rates of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in farming communities.At the time of the snub, Jayasumana told Mongabay he suspected that the agrochemical lobby had “negatively influence[d] the emerging scientific evidence linking one of Sri Lanka’s worst public health problems to the agrochemical industry.”This latest reversal, he said, showed that the research was sound.“Science has prevailed,” Jayasumana said. “That’s why, after certain groups opposed our selection and undermined our professional work, the research work has been upheld as credible.”He added the pair might only be presented with the award next year, but that what mattered was the vote of confidence from their fellow scientists.“It’s important to us because we highlighted a public health issue of immense importance to Sri Lanka, and that has been recognized by AAAS as deserving the scientific freedom and responsibility award,” Jayasumana said.On its website, the AAAS said, “The 2019 award was given to Sarath Gunatilake and Channa Jayasumana who investigated a possible connection between glyphosate and chronic kidney disease under challenging circumstances.”The language is more cautious that in its initial announcement on Feb. 4 (now inaccessible but archived elsewhere), where the AAAS referred to the Sri Lankan scientists as “public health researchers who battled powerful corporate interests to uncover the deadly effects of industrial herbicides.”The award is handed out annually to individuals and organizations “whose exemplary actions have demonstrated scientific freedom and/or responsibility in challenging circumstances,” and comes with a $5,000 prize.last_img read more

Obie promises high score in Bimini win for PLP

first_img#BahamasGeneralElections2017 #ObieWilchcombePromisesToWinBiminiForPLP Related Items: Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppBahamas, May 5th 2017, Bimini: Obie Wilchcombe is promising victory for the PLP in Bimini! The tourism minister send a strong message on Thursday night to his FNM Opponent Pakesia Parker, “You never get a lickin’ til you come to Bimini”. He says “this time we aint taking nobody for fun, this time we are serious here, to continue the path of growth” and promised to score big for the PLP come May 10th. The PLP’s gold team rolled into town, along with a slew of promises to expand the airport. Wilchcombe says flights direct from New York and Mexico were ready to come into Bimini, along with shops and restaurants for Biminites that would promote the sale of indigenous items.He went on to warn constituents not to give the FNM a chance, as Bimini could not afford to stop in its path of growth.center_img Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp #MagneticMediaNewslast_img read more

Mans body found near SDCCU Stadium

first_img KUSI Newsroom Posted: July 28, 2019 Updated: 8:50 AM Man’s body found near SDCCU Stadium Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwittercenter_img July 28, 2019 SAN DIEGO (KUSI) – A man’s body, suffering from possible trauma, was found near SDCCU Stadium in San Diego, police said today.A caller reported the discovery near 9449 Friars Road about 5:30 p.m. Saturday, San Diego Police Lt. Michelle Velovich said.“A preliminary investigation revealed signs of possible trauma to the upper body,” Velovich said. “The victim has been identified, but (his name) is being withheld pending family notification.”The department’s homicide unit asked anyone with information regarding the death to call them at 619-531-2293. KUSI Newsroom, last_img read more

ABM Adds Nine Companies to Membership Roster

first_imgABM, which is wrapping up its Executive Forum being held in Chicago this week, voted nine new companies into membership at its board of directors meeting Monday.Media members include Editorial Projects in Education, InsuranceNewsNet.com and new international member Beuth Verlag GmbH.The association also added six associate members, including Adobe Systems Inc., bXb Online, LiveIntent, MagToGo, Tout and WeiserMazars LLP. “These new members—ranging from traditional and international media companies to progressive businesses focused on app development, social media, virtual event technologies and digital monetization solutions—support ABM’s initiative to represent the wide range of platforms and models leveraged by business information and media companies,” said ABM president and CEO Clark Pettit in a statement. Meanwhile, news out of the Executive Forum includes a bit of research ABM did in partnership with Outsell that examined mobile content and business models. B-to-b executives responding to the joint survey, it seems, are not in it for the money—yet. Instead, brand enhancement, content delivery, serving advertisers’ needs and creating a superior digital experience were the top mobile objectives, with 64 percent, 60 percent, 60 percent and 52 percent of responses, respectively. At the bottom of the objectives list were “new revenue from mobile users (29 percent) and “enable mobile e-commerce” (24 percent).Additionally, only 20 percent of respondents indicated they have a formal mobile strategy in place. The majority of respondents (56 percent) say their mobile strategy is somewhere between formal and ad hoc. A quarter, or 24 percent, say mobile is on an ad hoc, project or case-by-case basis. Given that objectives aren’t quite standardized and that 40 percent of respondents expect to break even with their mobile investments and 48 percent expect a negative ROI, mobile initiatives are clearly still in the experimental phase.For more results from the study and the slide deck on the ABM/Outsell presentation from the Executive Forum, click here [pdf].last_img read more

NOW HIRING 10 New Job Openings In Wilmington

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below are some of the newest job openings in Wilmington:Part-Time Assistant Teacher at Little SproutsPart-Time Toddler Teacher’s Aide at Little SproutsPart-Time Member Services Representative at Planet FitnessPart-Time Package Handler at Fed-ExPart-Time Overnight Custodian at Planet FitnessFull-Time Logistics Associate at EcoLabFull-Time QC Clerk at TecometFull-Time Route Sales Representative at Frito LayFull-Time Severe Special Ed Teacher at May InstituteFull-Time General Warehouse Worker (2nd Shift) at S.G. Torrice(NOTE: Wilmington businesses — Feel free to send me your job postings at wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Thank You To Our Sponsor:Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedNOW HIRING: 10 New Job Openings In WilmingtonIn “Business”NOW HIRING: 50 New Job Openings In Wilmington (Week of August 18, 2019)In “Business”NOW HIRING: 10 New Job Openings In WilmingtonIn “Business”last_img read more

Canada launches Digital Charter to combat hate speech and fake news

first_img “Canadians can expect that digital platforms will not foster or disseminate hate, violent extremism or criminal content. The launch of the charter follows Canada last week signing the Christchurch Call following the March terrorist attack in Christchurch, New Zealand. “The platforms are failing their users, and they’re failing our citizens,” Trudeau said. “They have to step up in a major way to counter disinformation. And if they don’t, we will hold them to account and there will be meaningful financial consequences.” Canadian Prime Minister Justin TrudeauCanadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau Getty Images The Christchurch Call, led by New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and French President Emmanuel Macron, is a plan to prevent terrorists from uploading extremist content online, and to increase transparency around tech companies’ algorithms and the detection and removal of such content. Share your voice Politics Tech Industry Internet Security Culture Applications Mobile Apps Digital Media Online Universal access. Safety and security. Control and consent. Transparency, portability and interoperability. Open and modern digital government. A level playing field. Ensuring data and digital media are used for good. Strong democracy. Freedom from hate and violent extremism. Strong enforcement and real accountability. “The Government of Canada will defend freedom of expression and protect against online threats and disinformation designed to undermine the integrity of elections and democratic institutions,” the charter says. Canada wants to promote both safety and innovation online. Government of Canada The last three principles deal with hate speech and disinformation. Commentscenter_img Canada was joined by the governments of Australia, the UK, New Zealand, Germany, France, the European Commission, Indonesia, India, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Jordan, the Netherlands, Norway, Senegal, Spain and Sweden, as well as eight tech companies: Facebook, Google, Twitter, Amazon, Microsoft, Daily Motion, Qwant and YouTube. 5 The 10 principles of the charter are:  “There will be clear, meaningful penalties for violations of the laws and regulations that support these principles.” Tags The charter will target fake news and hate speech online, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said on Tuesday. The US didn’t sign the call. Canada has launched its new Digital Charter, designed to protect its citizens online and enforce rules governing social media platforms. Amazon Facebook Google Microsoft Twitterlast_img read more

Nintendo Switch V2 delivers a battery beatdown to the original Switch

first_img 1. For anyone looking to upgrade their #NintendoSwitch or get a #NintendoSwitchLite using a trade-in and transfer at a retail store, I just did it. Here’s how my transfer process went and what you should know BEFORE you head in to make the… Switch 😉 pic.twitter.com/RojIgWNHK2— ✨ ashley ✨ (@AshleyEsqueda) August 14, 2019 0 Dan Ackerman/CNET The Nintendo Switch Lite is still more than a month away, but there’s one new piece of Nintendo hardware you can get right now. The so-called V2 version of the dockable Switch has quietly made its way into stores, and some people are even trading in their original hardware for the new model.The difference between the two versions of the modular Switch is a processor upgrade that promises improved battery life (newer processors are often more power efficient than their predecessors). The new V2 battery claim from Nintendo is 4.5 to 9 hours, vs. 2.5 to 6.5 hours for the first-gen hardware. Both V2 and V1 Switches in hand, I ran a battery test on each. For this comparison, I ran non-stop video via the Switch’s YouTube app, with screen brightness at 100% and auto-brightness and sleep timers turned off. Note that V1 Switch used here has some mileage on it, but has been used almost exclusively docked. (What can I say? I’m a docker, not a hander.)Nintendo Switch V2: 4 hours 55 minutesNintendo Switch V1: 3 hours 30 minutes That’s a notable improvement, but is it worth selling or trading in your current Switch for a new one? I’d say it’s doubtful, especially as you’ll have to transfer game saves from one system to another, a process Nintendo complicates by deleting the data from the original Switch as part of the transfer process.My colleague Ashley Esqueda did just that, transferring her saves as part of a trade-in right at a retail store. She describes the process (and it’s a bit of a hassle) in great detail in this excellent Twitter thread.  Tags Computers Gaming Share your voice Post a comment I tried something different, transferring the saved content for a single game from the V1 Switch to the V2. By doing this, both Switch units can use the same account, but your saved game files are deleted from the original Switch when they get transferred to the new one. It’s also worth keeping track of which one is your primary Switch, which is an important designation Nintendo keeps track of. On your primary device, other user accounts on the same hardware can access your owned content. On a secondary device, only you can. If you’re convinced the Switch V2 is for you, just don’t go out and accidentally buy some old stock that’s still sitting on a store shelf. The only way I could find to tell the hardware apart is the model number stamped on the back. The original reads “HAC-001,” while V2 is “HAC-001 (-01).” But there’s also an easier way to tell the difference — the V2 Switch comes in a box with a red background on its front panel. But even if you just bought a V1 Switch, there’s hope, as Nintendo will swap out an original Switch purchased after July 17 for a new V2 model if you contact the company. See it at Best BuyDisclosure: CNET may get a share of revenue from the sale of products featured on this page. Nintendolast_img read more

Chinas Anbang raises offer for Starwood to 14 billion

first_imgChina’s Anbang Insurance Group Co raised its offer for Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide Inc to almost $14 billion, Starwood said on Monday, in the latest challenge to the U.S. hotel operator’s merger with Marriott International Inc.The bidding war for Starwood has pitted Marriott’s ambitions to create the world’s largest lodging company with about 5,700 hotels against Anbang’s drive to create a vast portfolio of U.S. real estate assets.The acquisition of Starwood, owner of the Sheraton and Westin brands, by Anbang would be the largest ever by a Chinese company in the United States.Anbang’s consortium, which includes private equity firms J.C. Flowers & Co and Primavera Capital Ltd, has offered $82.75 per share in cash, in what is reasonably likely to lead to a proposal that is superior to the deal with Marriott, Starwood said on Monday. Reuters had reported earlier on Monday that Anbang had raised its offer.Marriott’s latest cash-and-stock offer, which was announced on March 21, is currently worth around $78 per share. Starwood’s board has not yet changed its recommendation to its shareholders in support of the company’s merger with Marriott, Starwood said. A vote for Starwood shareholders to approve the Marriott deal is scheduled for April 8.”Marriott has the financial capacity and the wherewithal to push its bid up higher. However, so much of the transaction is based on Marriott’s current share price, I think investors would be less than thrilled if it increased its offer materially at this juncture,” said Bill Crow, an analyst at Raymond James.Marriott declined to say on Monday if it would raise its offer further. In a statement, Marriott said it was confident that the previously announced amended merger agreement with Starwood is the best course for both companies.”Starwood stockholders should give serious consideration to the question of whether the Anbang-led consortium will be able to close the proposed transaction, with a particular focus on the certainty of the consortium’s financing and the timing of any required regulatory approvals,” Marriott said in its statement.In any deal with Anbang or Marriott, Starwood shareholders will also receive stock in Interval Leisure Group Inc, which is getting Starwood’s vacation ownership business, currently worth $5.91 per Starwood share.Starwood shares were trading up 2.4 percent at $84.07 on Monday. Marriott shares were up 4 percent to $71.40, as some investors hoped Anbang’s move would prompt Marriott to walk away from an expensive deal.Anbang’s latest offer values Starwood at 13.5 times earnings. By comparison, peers Hyatt Hotels Corp and Hilton Worldwide Holdings Inc are trading at around ten times earnings.To be sure, the Anbang offer is still cheaper than some of large real estate deals seen in the run-up to the 2008 financial crisis. Buyout firm Blackstone Group LP’s $26 billion leveraged buyout of Hilton in 2007, for example, valued that company at 15 times earnings.CFIUS REVIEWMarriott said last week it believes it could achieve $250 million in annual cost synergies within two years after closing the deal with Starwood, up from $200 million estimated in November 2015 when it signed its original merger agreement.An acquisition of Starwood by Anbang would probably face scrutiny by the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS), an inter agency panel that reviews deals to ensure they do not harm national security. However, sources have said both Starwood and Anbang believe that deal would receive CFIUS clearance.Under its latest merger agreement with Marriott, Starwood would pay a breakup fee to Marriott of $450 million.Lazard and Citigroup Global Markets Inc are financial advisers to Starwood, and Cravath, Swaine & Moore LLP is its legal counsel. Deutsche Bank Securities and Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher are advising Marriott.PJT Partners Inc PJT.N is Anbang’s financial adviser, while Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP is its legal counsel.last_img read more