STETHS coach heading to Wolmer’s? … They’ll have to move a mountain to take him – principal

first_img Multimillion-dollar contract Sources have informed The Gleaner that Walcott has been offered a multimillion-dollar contract, which represents a 10 times improvement on his current deal with STETHS. Wellington, who praised Walcott for his work over the years in transforming STETHS into one of the strongest programmes in the country, however, maintains that there is no indication that his prized asset will be changing locations ahead of the coming season. The ISSA vice-president added that he has spoken to the coach, who he says informed him of an interest from Wolmer’s, but gave no indication that he will, in fact, be leaving. “I would have spoken to him; he volunteered to speak with me and I still have no information that he is heading to Wolmer’s, whether from the reports or the conversation I have had with him,” Wellington said. “Nothing I have read or heard says he is going to Wolmer’s. I have read where he is the person being targeted by Wolmer’s, and based on the conversation I have had with him, that is as much as I know as well. “… He (Walcott) is the target of their (Wolmer’s) interest, but I don’t know that he is going there,” Wellington noted. Of note, Walcott is currently a member of the MVP Track Club support staff, providing technical support at training sessions and is a feature at the club’s local exercises, overseas camps and international competition. Walcott, who first arrived at STETHS as a 12-year-old in seventh grade, returned to coach the team after four years of study at the University of Technology. He is in his fourth year at the helm of the programme. He is today considered to be one of the best young minds in track and field coaching and was rewarded for his work with head coach duties for Jamaica’s team to the recent Carifta Games in Grenada, where the team won 86 medals. This year, STETHS finished fifth in the boys’ section at Champs with 100 points and seventh in the female section with 71 points. Last year’s effort saw the Santa Cruz-based team also taking fifth place in the boys’ section (132 points) and ninth in the female section (51 points). In the 2014 instalment, STETHS again finished fifth in the boys’ section with 123 points and eighth in the female side on 65 points. Principal of St Elizabeth Technical High School (STETHS), Keith Wellington, said he has not been informed that his track and field head coach, Reynaldo Walcott, is heading to Wolmer’s Boys’ School and is confident it will take a massive effort to poach his prized coach. As earlier reported on www.jamaica-gleaner.com, Walcott is strongly tipped to take over the reins at the Heroes Circle-based institution after its entire coaching staff headed by Christopher Harley was shown the door following another disappointing season, which culminated in a ninth place finish and 50-point tally at the ISSA-GraceKennedy Boys and Girls’ Athletics Championships. This follows the school’s back-to-back sixth-place finishes in the boys’ section at the 2015 and 2014 championships. Harley was said to have lost the confidence of several influential members of the Wolmer’s community, such as MVP Track Club coach Stephen Francis, who has been a long-time supporter of the programme. “I am confident that it will take a mountain to move him (Walcott) from St Elizabeth Technical,” Wellington told The Gleaner yesterday. “If he is going to move, those interested will have to plan to move a mountain.”last_img read more

1,200 Traditional Fishermen Appeal for Support

first_imgTraditional fishermen are Liberians who are engaged in small scale fishing in communities located along the beaches of the Atlantic Ocean. They depend on the practice as a trade as well as to feed their families, and 1,210 of them want support from the Liberian government and other public and non-governmental organizations in the sector.According to Mr. Wle Wle Kofa, chairman of the Traditional Fishermen Association of Liberia, (TFAL), members from West Point to New Kru Town and other areas that border the Atlantic Ocean are in need of material support.“Our members are hard hit by the coastal erosion that has affected West Point, New Kru Town, Colonel West and Popo Beach and I think it is about time the government and organizations in the sector turn to support our members,” Mr. Kofa said in an interview yesterday in Monrovia.He said TFAL has members from Cape Palmas, Maryland County to Monrovia, Montserrado County and they all suffer from the increasing coastal erosion that has affected Liberia in the last couple of years.“Our members live in poor and extremely poor communities and their children hardly get better education,” Kofa said, adding, “I think this sector has been ignored for a long time and it deserves some attention by the government and non-government organizations in the sector.”Kofa explained that traditional Liberian fishermen use smaller canoes for their work hence are unable to raise themselves above the poverty line. As a result their children suffer greatly, said Kofa. “Many times male children of fishermen follow their fathers to do the very job that has kept them down for so long,” he said, adding that, “without financial support that could help them purchase bigger canoes for large catches, the situation remains the same year after year.”The females, he said, to a large extent end up with children at an early age, “and this is not good for the country. The women later get involved in drying and selling fish at the various markets and the cycle continues.”Kofa made an appeal to the Liberian government not to forget the sector and those who spend their lives making a living in the only trade they know. “This particular industry has been practiced by our people from time immemorial and so we must find means to grow it.”Mrs. Betty Nyanti, a mother of eight, is the head of women whose husbands engage in small scale fishing in Colonel West. “I have been able to educate seven of my kids and only the 8th child followed his father to become a fisherman,” she said, “it’s been hard but I am thankful that my husband Stephen has been of great help.”She said her husband is sometimes fortunate to make a huge catch but “very often we sell some and use some for the family.” She admitted it is a hand to mouth occupation because at times, “Stephen returns with nothing.” She said the majority of her women friends have not been lucky.“Many children, particularly the women, don’t really get good education and they follow their mothers to sell in the market,” she said. She hoped the sector can be improved.Many Liberians residing in coastal areas of the country are involved in small scale fishing from Cape Mount, Grand Bassa, Grand Kru, Sinoe, Maryland and Montserrado counties, for what Mr. Kofa describes as ‘fishing to survive,’ and are in need of government and partners’ support to raise their occupation to a better level.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more